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I have a flash which outputs a PNG file in 72DPI, I need to execute the following steps (not necessarily in that order) in order to make it ready for print:

  1. Convert to 300DPI
  2. Resize to 9x5 cm
  3. Put cross (for cutting later) on it
  4. Save as PDF - 300DPI

With my little of tutorial reading + knowledge in IM, I got this far: 1. convert -units PixelsPerInch IMAGE.PNG -resample 300 IMAGE_300DPI.png 2. convert IMAGE_300DPI.png -resize 1111x639 IMAGE_300DPI_correct_size.png 3. composite -gravity center IMAGE_300DPI_correct_size.png cross.png card_new_with_cross.png 4. convert card_new_with_cross.png card_new.pdf

When I execute stage #4 everything changes and gets enlarged as far as I can tell, any Ideas?

by the way - 2 files (sideA.png & cross.png) can be found at: http://www.bikur.co.il/sideA.png <-- the image http://www.bikur.co.il/cross.png <-- the `cross-

It would be great if someone can help me with it

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I believe you misunderstood size and dpi (resolution). Elaborate, what are you going to do. –  p4553d Apr 28 '11 at 11:00

1 Answer 1

DPI is a conversion factor, not a measurement. It's used to convert an image's intrinsic pixels into some display medium's pixel.

e.g. a 300 dpi printer has "pixels" that are 1/300 inches in size, while a 72dpi monitor has 1/72 inch sized pixels. A 100x100@72dpi image on a monitor would have to be printed out at about 417x417 printer pixels to have the same apparent size (300/72 = 4.16666)

So, whatever size your image is initially, to get a 9x5cm image @ 300dpi, it'd have to be converted as follows:

9 x 5cm = 3.543 x 1.968 inches @ 300dpi = 1063 x 591

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Your answer is not so clear. can you please elaborate it more. –  user3305818 Jul 9 at 11:05

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