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In my quest to develop some coding "best practices" for myself I would like to ask people how they arrange class member variables and getter/setter properties within their class definition. I have seen it done two ways ...

(1) Declare class member variables at the top of the class ad then in a seperate section declare the properties that get/set those member variables.

Class MyClass
{
  String firstName;
  String lastName;

  public string FirstName
  {
    get { return firstName; }
    set { firstName = value; }
  }

  public string LastName
  {
    get { return lastName; }
    set { lastName = value; }
  }

}

(2) Declare class member variables at the top of the class and define the get/set properties right below the variable declaration.

Class MyClass
{
  String firstName;
  public string FirstName
  {
    get { return firstName; }
    set { firstName = value; }
  }

  String lastName;
  public string LastName
  {
    get { return lastName; }
    set { lastName = value; }
  }

}

Though it may be a matter or personal preference which pattern do people tend to follow and if possible, please give a reason as to why. Thanks.

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As you're not doing anything in your get/set, have you considered using autoproperties instead? Then your question kind of goes away... –  forsvarir Apr 27 '11 at 20:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're not doing anything in the property get/sets, use auto-properties, you can always change them later if you need to:

public string LastName {get;set;}

Personally, I like to put all of my member variables at the bottom of the class, following the principle that the stuff clients are interested in (i.e. the public stuff) should be located nearer the top of the file. Lots of people seem to prefer having the members at the top, but it's always seemed a bit backwards to me :)

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1  
Yes, it's always seemed backwards to me as well. I guess it's a hangover from the days where you had to declare something before you could use it? –  Groky Apr 27 '11 at 21:05
    
I think with modern IDEs which display members structurally and sort them as you like it is no more the case. What's the difference when you navigate through the code 99% of time using your navigation bar in IDE? –  FractalizeR Apr 28 '11 at 7:02
    
@FractalizeR: To be honest, I rarely use the navigation bar in the IDE. I tend to try to keep my classes quite small/focused and my hands on the keyboad. It's usually faster for me to page up/down than put my hand on the mouse. The most useful navigation shortcuts are the 'goto XXXX' family and I can access those easily through the keyboard. I guess to an extent, it depends what you're used to. –  forsvarir Apr 28 '11 at 7:18

I prefer option number 1, and then I surround fields in a Fields region, properties in Properties region, constructors, methods, etc, etc. The regions of course allow you to collapse parts of the code to further improve readability (if you only want to look at the constructors for example).

Just a personal preference, but makes classes nicely organized.

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1  
Eww, I hate regions. When I look at code I want to see what it's doing. How often do you come to a program you've never seen before and think "I only want to look at the constructors for this class"? You want to see the whole class. IMO it obfuscates the code unnecessarily. –  Groky Apr 27 '11 at 20:59
    
Hey to each their own! I'm a region lover, what can I say? As a consultant, I look at code all the time, that I didn't write, that I've never seen before, and yeah, it's really nice to be able to collapse a certain aspect(s) of a class while I'm working on it. –  BrandonZeider Apr 27 '11 at 21:04
    
Well, each to his own ;) I find knowing what the class does more important than knowing if each member is a constructor/property/method etc. You can always collapse the whole class with Ctrl+M, L and then just expand the method you're interested in anyway. –  Groky Apr 27 '11 at 21:09
    
Agreed - I use Ctrl+M, L a lot –  BrandonZeider Apr 28 '11 at 0:28

Though it's down to personal preference, I prefer option 1, but with the private members at the bottom. Reasoning: API is more important than implementation:

class MyClass
{
  public string FirstName
  {
    get { return firstName; }
    set { firstName = value; }
  }

  public string LastName
  {
    get { return lastName; }
    set { lastName = value; }
  }

  String firstName;
  String lastName;
}
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