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Ive been working on a project with ZendFramework and Doctrine2 and have noticed an issue with my action controllers not being very 'DRY'. Given the following example, which is pretty much identical throughout all of my controllers what would be the best approach to factor out the repetition. I think that a baseController would be by far the easiest, but it seems that extending Zend_Controller_Action is frowned upon. The other two options that I am leaning toward is to create an action helper or controller plugin(but controller plugins these are still a fuzzy concept to me).
So my question is, what would be the best way to do this? and why?

class Job_JobController extends Zend_Controller_Action
{

   protected $_service;

   public function init()
   {
        $ajaxContext = $this->_helper->getHelper('AjaxContext');
        $ajaxContext->addActionContext('create', 'html')
                    ->addActionContext('update', 'html')
                    ->addActionContext('view', 'html')
                    ->addActionContext('delete', 'html')
                    ->addActionContext('message', 'html')
                    ->initContext();
        $this->_service = $this->_helper->service('job');
    }

    public function indexAction()
    {
         $this->_forward('list');
    }

    public function listAction()
    {
        $grid = $this->_service->getGrid();
        $this->view->list = $grid->render();      
    }

    public function createAction()
    {
        $request = $this->getRequest();
        $formMediator = $this->_service->getFormMediator();

        if ($request->isPost() && $formMediator->isValid($request->getPost()))
        {
            $this->_service->saveEntity($formMediator->transfer());
            $this->_helper->flashMessenger->addMessage(array('statusCode' => 'Create::Success'));
            $this->_forward('message');
        }

        $this->view->entity = $formMediator->getForm();       
    }

    public function updateAction()
    {
        $request = $this->getRequest();
        $formMediator = $this->_service->getFormMediator();
        $entity = $this->_service->findEntity($request->getParam('id'));

        if ($request->isPost() && $formMediator->isValid($request->getPost()))
        {
            $this->_service->saveEntity($formMediator->transfer($entity));
            $this->_helper->flashMessenger->addMessage(array('statusCode' => 'Update::Success'));
            $this->_forward('message');
        } 
        else
        {
            $formMediator->populate($entity);
        }

        $this->view->entity = $formMediator->getForm();
    }


    public function viewAction()
    {
        $request = $this->getRequest();
        $this->view->entity = $this->_service->getEntity($request->getParam('id'));
    }

    public function deleteAction()
    {
        $request = $this->getRequest();
        $id = $request->getParam('id');

        if ($this->getRequest()->isPost())
        {
            $this->_service->delete($request->getParam('id'));
            $this->_helper->flashMessenger->addMessage(array('statusCode' => 'Delete::Success'));
            $this->_forward('message'); 
         }

         $this->view->deleteId = $id;
    }

    public function messageAction()
    {
         $messages = array_merge((array)$this->_helper->flashMessenger->getMessages(), 
                     (array)$this->_helper->flashMessenger->getCurrentMessages());
         $this->view->messages = $messages;
    }

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not a real answer, but I think the both ways (extending Zend_Controller_Action, or Action-Helper) are the solutions you are looking for. I dont see any reason, why an abstract controller is somewhat ... ugly(?), too. Its the way OOP works.

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Action Helpers seem to be by far the most flexible –  John Apr 28 '11 at 5:18

There's nothing wrong with extending the Zend_Controller_Action. For our software we extended it and use the preDispatch() function to verify that the user has authenticated and display a login screen if they have not. Now all our controllers extend that one, and we don't have to do anything for all our pages to require a login.

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1  
you should use Front Controller plugin for authentication. You can have controller that won't need authentication and you'll need other parent class. –  Tomáš Fejfar Apr 28 '11 at 1:05
1  
yes, Tomas. We have BaseController extend Zend_Controller_Action, and AuthenticatedController extend BaseController. Most of our controllers use the AuthenticatedController, but some just use the Base. –  Bob Baddeley Apr 28 '11 at 2:27
    
I've done that for my first project (as it's the easiest and most obvious solution), but in our company we use the Plugin based solution and it's much better. –  Tomáš Fejfar Apr 28 '11 at 11:00
    
The question was more about authorization. For authentication I'm with Thomas: Using a plugin decouples the authentication from the controllers (why should they even know authentication exists?) and gives you the possibility to change authentication rules without touching any code (depending on the plugin). –  KingCrunch May 29 '12 at 18:29

I think an abstract controller should be fine, although I sometimes find it a little inelegant because testing the abstract class' behaviour is tricky.

One thing you could do having seen this code is Replace Temp with Query. You're making temp variable assignments for little purpose other than saving a trivial amount of typing (and sometimes typing even more than you need to). Sometimes it's worth typing a few extra characters, to reduce the number of temp/local variables in your methods which aids refactoring.

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