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public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }
    List<System.Timers.Timer> list = new List<System.Timers.Timer>();
    List<Thread> ltread = new List<Thread>();
    Thread t1;
    System.Timers.Timer tick;
    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        {
            ltread[i]=new Thread(list[i].Start);
            ltread[i].Start();
        }
    }
    void OnTimer(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {

        ((System.Timers.Timer)sender).Stop();
        BeginInvoke(new MethodInvoker(() =>
        {
            textBox1.Text += "I have ended\r\n";

        }));

    }

    private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        {
           tick = new System.Timers.Timer();
            tick.Interval = 3000;
            tick.Elapsed+=new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(OnTimer);
            ltread.Add(t1);
            list.Add(tick);

        }
    }
}

how can I get the number of the elpased timer ?

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Have you considered using Threading.Timer instead? What were your thoughts? –  GregC Apr 27 '11 at 21:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is this what you meant?

int index = list.IndexOf(((System.Timers.Timer)sender));
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well, when timer enters OnTimer(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e) i need to know what is the index of this timer) –  Tirmit Apr 27 '11 at 21:47

Unfortunately, System.Timers.Timer doesn't give you the ability to attach an arbitrary value that is passed to the Elapsed event handler. You can do that with System.Threading.Timer, although it will require a little bit of modification to your code.

Your creation code would look like this:

for (int i = 0; i < 5; ++i)
{
    var tick = new System.Threading.Timer(TimerTick, i, 3000, 3000);
    list.Add(tick);
}

The second parameter to the constructor is user-specific data that will be passed to the callback. In this case, I'm just telling it to pass the timer number.

Of course, your list will have to be List<System.Threading.Timer>.

The timer uses a callback method rather than an event. The callback looks like this:

void TimerTick(object state)
{
    int timerNumber = (int)state;
    list[timerNumber].Change(Timeout.Infinite, Timeout.Infinite); // stops the timer.
}

If your timers will always fire only once and then stop, you can initialize them as one-shot rather than periodic. With System.Timers.Timer, just set the AutoReset property to False. With System.Threading.Timer, pass Timeout.Infinite as the last argument to the constructor. If you do that, then there's no reason to stop the timer in the event handler or callback method.

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