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I have a table with three fields: ID,Value,Count

ID and Value make up the PK.

Given an ID I want to select a value weighted by Count and then decrement the count by one.

So If I have

1  A  2
1  B  3

I should have a 2/5 chance of getting an A and a 3/5 chance of getting a B. If A is selected the table should look like this after

1  A  1
1  B  3

Next time A will have a 1/4 chance of being selected and B will have a 3/4

Ideas?

Thanks!

Update:

The Weight is like the number of chips of that value that would be placed in a bag. And then one randomly chosen.

share|improve this question
    
what happens when weight becomes '0' – M.R. Apr 27 '11 at 22:24
    
it is no longer included in the calculation – kralco626 Apr 27 '11 at 22:28
    
and can you have two values with the same weight? what happens then, one gets picked randomly? – M.R. Apr 27 '11 at 22:34
    
also, how many records will you have in this table? – M.R. Apr 27 '11 at 22:41
    
What version of SQL Server? And how many records per id (on average) and is there a maximum weight value? – Martin Smith Apr 27 '11 at 22:48
up vote 4 down vote accepted
CREATE TABLE #Vals
(
ID INT,
Value CHAR(1),
[Count] INT,
PRIMARY KEY(ID,Value)
)

INSERT INTO #Vals
SELECT 1,'A',2 UNION ALL
SELECT 1,'B',3

;WITH Nums AS
(
SELECT number 
FROM master..spt_values
WHERE number>0 AND type='P'
), Row AS
(
SELECT TOP 1 v.*
FROM #Vals v
JOIN Nums n ON n.number <= v.[Count]
WHERE v.ID=1
ORDER BY CHECKSUM(NEWID())
)
UPDATE Row 
SET [Count] = [Count] -1
OUTPUT inserted.*


DROP TABLE #Vals
share|improve this answer
    
You confused me :) I don't really understand what the code is doing – kralco626 Apr 27 '11 at 23:09
    
@kralco626 - If the weight is 10 (for example) it joins onto the numbers table to expand that out to 10 rows, allocates a random weight to each row, sorts the results using a TOP N sort (it doesn't have to actualy sort the result set in its entirety it is only interested in the TOP 1 weighted row) then updates that selected row to decrement the counter and uses the OUTPUT clause to return the result to the client. I wasn't sure that doing weight*random number was good maths or not. If it turns out it is then that will be easy enough to implement. – Martin Smith Apr 27 '11 at 23:17
1  
Good idea... by joining with a table of all natural numbers we can make multiple rows out of one row. Then we can just randomly pick a row. – AndreKR Apr 27 '11 at 23:20
    
OH! now I get it, thanks AndreKR, didn't get that he was selecting a table of all natural numbers! +1 – kralco626 Apr 29 '11 at 11:42

In MySQL (maybe someone could translate it into an MSSQL UPDATE statement?) this would give you the line that needs to be decremented:

SELECT *
FROM t
WHERE ID = 1
AND (
  SELECT COALESCE(SUM(Count), 0)
  FROM t i
  WHERE ID = 1
  AND i.Value < t.Value
) <= (
  SELECT FLOOR(SUM(Count) * RAND())
  FROM t
)
ORDER BY Value DESC
LIMIT 1

Because it's O(n²), it will be slow for large sets of data, though.

share|improve this answer

Try this (provided you don't have too many records in this table). I made a structure like so:

id          value                                              weight
----------- -------------------------------------------------- -----------
1           A                                                  2
1           B                                                  3

And then ran the below code. Keep in mind that after a certain time, all your weight will become zero, and at that point you will have no returned value. Also, I am assuming that if there is no weight match based on the random return, then return the most weight value. If that is not what you want, just take out the last null check


declare @weight_sum int
declare @rand_weight_value int
declare @selected_value varchar(10)
declare @id int
declare @weight int

select @weight_sum = SUM(weight) from table1 where id = 1
select @rand_weight_value = ROUND(((@weight_sum - 1) * RAND() + 1), 0) 

print @rand_weight_value

declare getEm cursor local  for select ID, [value], [weight] from table1 where id = 1 and [weight] > 0 order by [weight]

open getEm
        while (1=1)
        begin
                 fetch next from getEm into @id, @selected_value, @weight

                 if (@@fetch_status  0)
                    begin
                        DEALLOCATE getEm
                        break
                    end


                if(@weight >= @rand_weight_value)
                begin
                        update table1 set [weight] = [weight] - 1 where ID = @id and [value] = @selected_value

                        DEALLOCATE getEm
                        break
                end

        end

-- if no match on the weight value
if(@selected_value is null)
begin
    select @id = id, @selected_value = [value] from table1 where [weight] > 0 and id = 1 order by weight desc
         update table1 set weight = weight - 1 where id = @id
end
select @selected_value

share|improve this answer
    
Shouldn't you sum up all the @weights you already fetched and compare that sum against @rand_wight_value? – AndreKR Apr 27 '11 at 23:04
    
+1 for being (hopefully) valid MSSQL code and solving the performance issues by walking the data only once – AndreKR Apr 27 '11 at 23:06
    
The Weight is like the number of chips of that value that would be placed in a bag. And then one randomly chosen. – kralco626 Apr 27 '11 at 23:06
    
Yes, and the @weight_sum is the number of chips. So he chooses a @rand_weight_value between 0 and the number of chips and then compares it to the @weight of a single value. – AndreKR Apr 27 '11 at 23:12
    
@AndreKR - yes, I am adding them up in the beginning to generate the random value, that will then be compared against each of the weights.... ideally I would like to even avoid one walk across the whole table.... I wish there was some way I could test for ranges... – M.R. Apr 28 '11 at 1:54

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