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Is it ok to do the following? Obviously the caller is not prevented from deleting the naked pointer. Should I use shared_ptr and return a shared_ptr? It seems too heavy for this.

class A
{
   B* GetB() { return pointer.get(); }
private:
   unique_ptr<B> pointer;
};
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Clearly, you no longer possess a unique pointer, as you intend for multiples to coexist. I would start by questioning my assumptions. – Dennis Zickefoose Apr 27 '11 at 22:34
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think that it should work fine as it is, making it clear in the documentation that such pointer is not intended to be deleted.

Still, I would probably return a reference: in that case it's implicit that the caller mustn't delete anything.

class A
{
   B & GetB() { return *(pointer.get()); }
private:
   unique_ptr<B> pointer;
};

Edit it turns out that the pointer can be NULL; in such case, the reference must be avoided.

You could create some kind of smart-dumb do_not_delete_me_ptr class that just encapsulates the pointer and make extra clear that you must not delete it, but I think this too is overkill. ;)

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the issue is the object can be null – Sriram Subramanian Apr 27 '11 at 21:58
    
Then a pointer is perfect for you. – André Caron Apr 27 '11 at 22:01
1  
@Sriram: well, then the reference is definitely out of choice, since dereferencing a NULL pointer (even to create a reference) is UB. I'd go with the naked pointer+doc warning, then, using shared_ptr for this stuff is way overkill. – Matteo Italia Apr 27 '11 at 22:01

From the boost docs on unique_ptr:

A unique_ptr is not CopyConstructible, nor CopyAssignable, however it is MoveConstructible and Move-Assignable.

You can't return the unique_ptr itself anyways (because you're keeping a copy as a member).

If the object is guaranteed to be allocated (i.e. the pointer is never null), I would return a reference.

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1  
He's not returning a unique_ptr, he's returning the pointer that the unique_ptr is encapsulating. – Matteo Italia Apr 27 '11 at 21:58
    
Sorry, mis-phrased my answer. This should be fixed. – André Caron Apr 27 '11 at 21:59
    
é: now it's fine. :) – Matteo Italia Apr 27 '11 at 22:02

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