Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I got some propably trivial question.

If I got defined EJB3+ interface, lets say it's remote like that:

@Remote
public class FooServiceRemote {
   void foo();
}

and one implementation

@Stateless
public class FooService implements FooServiceRemote {
   void foo() { ... }
}

How does the application server by default resolves what implementation to use (and call via proxy) if he knows only @EJB annotation for dependency injection like on interface:

public class SomeClass {
   @EJB
   private FooServiceRemote fooService;
}

Is it done by reflection (shortening name of interface)? Or he scans possible implementations of such interface, choosing one. Or.. ? And what if I want to create more implementations of one interface, is it possible and how to specify what implementation should be instantiated (maybe it is possible via some argument of annotation).

Thanks:-)

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In the rare case that you need to have two beans implementing the same interface (not a good practice), you can name them and choose which one you want by name.

@Stateless(name="FooService1")
public class FooService1 implements FooService { }

@Stateless(name="FooService2")
public class FooService2 implements FooService { }

public class SomeClass {
   @EJB(beanName="FooService1") 
   private FooService fooService;
}

Other possible approaches are looking it up using JNDI or the mappedName property. See the javadoc for EJB annotation here: http://download.oracle.com/javaee/6/api/javax/ejb/EJB.html

share|improve this answer
    
ye, that is propably what I was looking for. Do you think that it is not a good practice to have more implementations of same interface?:) –  d1x Apr 27 '11 at 23:18
    
Let me imagine this. You got some database access. This time you use JPA. You define EJB interface which has methods like saveObject(MyObj obj). By the evolution new approach comes, lets say this approach is like key-value pair databases (which btw comes back to fashion), so you dont want to use your JPA impl. But it would be sad to delete it. So you do a new implementation and switch it. –  d1x Apr 27 '11 at 23:30
    
I don't see many reasons for using that feature. I mean, maybe you are replacing a service implementation with a more performant one and need to have both running for a while. Still, things like multiple implementations per Interface and EJB Polymorphism just don't look right for me by a architectural point of view (or maybe I'm just getting old and rusty lol). –  Anthony Accioly Apr 27 '11 at 23:34
    
I feel it too. That this smells... not good. But still, when imaginating my example. There is no real good reason to simply delete old implementation. Or is there?:-) –  d1x Apr 27 '11 at 23:36
1  
I see what you mean, but as I said, my old school approach would be to have different ejb jars, say persistence-jpa.jar and persistence-google-datastore.jar, and, never, ever have both running at the same time (so, I guess maybe two implementations of a service are ok, but I would do that in a way that services are pluggable without the client code having to specify which one). –  Anthony Accioly Apr 27 '11 at 23:40

Just a fix,

@Remote
interface FooServiceRemote {
   void foo();
}

@Stateless
public class FooService implements FooServiceRemote {
   void foo() { ... }
}

With this, application server knows which classes implements the specified interface.

If you have two classes, you must specifify which class do you need.

share|improve this answer
    
ok, thx I forgot, updated the post. But how to specify what class I need to instantiate? –  d1x Apr 27 '11 at 22:29
    
:D. Topera, what's the odds? –  Anthony Accioly Apr 27 '11 at 22:42
    
Hi Anthony! You're right, man. Cheers (+1 to you) –  Topera Apr 28 '11 at 12:20
    
It's a tiny world, man.... –  Topera Apr 28 '11 at 12:23
    
;) My Kudos hehehe. –  Anthony Accioly Apr 28 '11 at 13:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.