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I have code that makes a server side call to another web service. In many situations this is over SSL. We have problems where this fails when the stars are not completely aligned. I realize that the certificate must be trusted and the internal certificate authorities (CAs) likely have to be manually imported into the trusted root certificate store on the servers. However, there are other cases as well. Today I ran into a problem where if I use a browser to hit the URL I get a warning stating that:

The name on the security certificate is invalid or does not match the name of the site

This is just a warning that you can acknowledge with the browser and tell it to continue to the site.

However, it seems to prevent my code from working. Here is a condensed version of my code:

HttpWebRequest request = WebRequest.Create(url) as HttpWebRequest;
request.Credentials = new NetworkCredential(user, password);
HttpWebResponse response = request.GetResponse() as HttpWebResponse;

In looking at HttpWebRequest I don't see anything obvious that would help me out and I don't currently have the luxury of trying things out in my developer environment. Is there a simple change I can make to fix this? Are there other similar gotchas I can prevent this way as well?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Kirk, have you looked into using ServerCertificateValidationCallback and simply returning true (as a test) and then augmenting the error checking for the special cases? You can also check out What is the best way of handling non-validating SSL certificates in C# for some other info on checking cer

Working solution:

HttpWebRequest request = WebRequest.Create(url) as HttpWebRequest;
request.Credentials = new NetworkCredential(user, password);
ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback = delegate(object certsender, X509Certificate cert, X509Chain chain, System.Net.Security.SslPolicyErrors error)
{
    return true;
}
HttpWebResponse response = request.GetResponse() as HttpWebResponse;

See also SSLPolicyErrors for the enumeration to review in the delegate.

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Thanks, Pete. I'll need to create a quick test program to hand to the client and see if this works. It may take some time for me to make that happen, but I'll post the response here once I give it a shot. –  Kirk Liemohn Apr 28 '11 at 15:58
    
Verified. That fixes the problem. I have edited your response with the code that works. I recognize that this is less secure and can make it a configurable option where the customer can choose which SSLPolicyError to override. –  Kirk Liemohn Apr 28 '11 at 20:25

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