Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm not sure why I get the following error when trying to overload the = operator

error: passing ‘const MyCircle’ as ‘this’ argument of ‘double MyCircle::getRadius()’ discards qualifiers|

Code:

#include <iostream>

#define PI 3.14

using namespace std;


class MyCircle
{
  public:
    MyCircle();
    MyCircle(int r);
    MyCircle(const MyCircle& c);
    void setRadius(double r);
    double getRadius();
    double getArea();
    static void increaseInstanceCount();
    static int getInstanceCount();
    MyCircle operator=(const MyCircle &);

  private:
    double radius;
    static int instanceCount;
};

int MyCircle::instanceCount = 0;

/**
1. A default constructor, that sets the radius to 0
**/
MyCircle::MyCircle()
{
    radius = 0.0;
    increaseInstanceCount();
}

/**
2. A one argument costructor that accepts an int and uses it to initialize the radius
**/
MyCircle::MyCircle(int r)
{
    radius = r;
    increaseInstanceCount();
}

/**
3. A copy constructor that accepts a Circle reference as an argument, and uses it to initialize radius
**/
MyCircle::MyCircle(const MyCircle& c)
{
    radius = c.radius;
    increaseInstanceCount();
}

void MyCircle::increaseInstanceCount()
{
    instanceCount++;
}

int MyCircle::getInstanceCount()
{
    return instanceCount;
}
void MyCircle::setRadius(double r)
{
    radius = r;
}

double MyCircle::getRadius()
{
    return radius;
}

double MyCircle::getArea()
{
    return (radius * radius) * PI;
}

//overload = operator
MyCircle MyCircle::operator=(const MyCircle &rhs)
{
    if(this == &rhs)
        return *this;

    radius = rhs.getRadius();
    return *this;

}

int main()
{
    MyCircle circle;
    circle.setRadius(5.4);
    MyCircle circle2;
    circle2.setRadius(3.0);
    MyCircle circle3;
    circle3.setRadius(343.3);

    cout << "Total instances: " << circle.getInstanceCount() << endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
5 answers in the same 10 seconds :) –  sehe Apr 27 '11 at 23:37
add comment

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to add a const qualifier to the getRadius() method, like

double MyCircle::getRadius() const
{
    return radius;
}

this will qualify the method to be called with an const object. You might want to add this qualifier to any methods that don't change member variables, avoiding this type of error.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, all ... –  Tony Apr 27 '11 at 23:48
    
this will also work for overload of '()' operator used in priority_queues. If you are having troubles running the object's methods inside the '()' overload method, this answer will fix it! You'll be able to use all of the 'const' flagged methods of the objects inside the '()' overload method. this answer is really great and complete... thanks Vargas! –  Bengalaa Nov 24 '13 at 15:20
add comment

Because your getRadius() isn't declared const.

Change the declaration of it to:

double getRadius() const;

and change the definition of it to

double MyCircle::getRadius() const
{
    return radius;
}

You are calling getRadius() via a const reference. Since you don't currently have the method declared const, you're getting that error.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You should declare and define your getRadius function as const:

double MyCircle::getRadius() const
{
    return radius;
}

On a side note, there is no reason for you to define a custom operator= for this class, the default will work fine. Also, if you do define operator=, it should probably return by reference.

share|improve this answer
add comment

getRadius is not a const method, while rhs is const. So a non-const method may alter the contents of the class, while a const method tells the compiler to flag any alterations of the instance as an error.

In this case, you can change getRadius to const by adding the const keyword in the method signature

double MyCircle::getRadius() const
{
    return radius;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

In operator=, rhs is declared const, but radius() is called and not declared const. Const correctness is a pain.

You can either declare radius() const or you can just read the radius instance variable directly, like you do in the copy constructor.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You need to mark getRadius() as a const accessor:

double getRadius() const;
double getArea() const;

...

double MyCircle::getRadius() const
{
    return radius;
}

double MyCircle::getArea() const
{
    return (radius * radius) * PI;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.