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Given a vector of strings, what is the best way to write them out to a HDF5 dataset? At the moment I'm doing something like the following:

  const unsigned int MaxStrLength = 512;

  struct TempContainer {
    char string[MaxStrLength];
  };

  void writeVector (hid_t group, std::vector<std::string> const & v)
  {
    //
    // Firstly copy the contents of the vector into a temporary container
    std::vector<TempContainer> tc;
    for (std::vector<std::string>::const_iterator i = v.begin ()
                                              , end = v.end ()
      ; i != end
      ; ++i)
    {
      TempContainer t;
      strncpy (t.string, i->c_str (), MaxStrLength);
      tc.push_back (t);
    }


    //
    // Write the temporary container to a dataset
    hsize_t     dims[] = { tc.size () } ;
    hid_t dataspace = H5Screate_simple(sizeof(dims)/sizeof(*dims)
                               , dims
                               , NULL);

    hid_t strtype = H5Tcopy (H5T_C_S1);
    H5Tset_size (strtype, MaxStrLength);

    hid_t datatype = H5Tcreate (H5T_COMPOUND, sizeof (TempConainer));
    H5Tinsert (datatype
      , "string"
      , HOFFSET(TempContainer, string)
      , strtype);

    hid_t dataset = H5Dcreate1 (group
                          , "files"
                          , datatype
                          , dataspace
                          , H5P_DEFAULT);

    H5Dwrite (dataset, datatype, H5S_ALL, H5S_ALL, H5P_DEFAULT, &tc[0] );

    H5Dclose (dataset);
    H5Sclose (dataspace);
    H5Tclose (strtype);
    H5Tclose (datatype);
}

At a minimum, I would really like to change the above so that:

  1. It uses variable length strings
  2. I don't need to have a temporary container

I have no restrictions over how I store the data so for example, it doesn't have to be a COMPOUND datatype if there is a better way to do this.

EDIT: Just to narrow the problem down, I'm relatively familiar with playing with the data on the C++ side, it's the HDF5 side where I need most of the help.

Thanks for your help.

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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

[Many thanks to dirkgently for his help in answering this.]

To write a variable length string in HDF5 use the following:

// Create the datatype as follows
hid_t datatype = H5Tcopy (H5T_C_S1);
H5Tset_size (datatype, H5T_VARIABLE);

// 
// Pass the string to be written to H5Dwrite
// using the address of the pointer!
const char * s = v.c_str ();
H5Dwrite (dataset
  , datatype
  , H5S_ALL
  , H5S_ALL
  , H5P_DEFAULT
  , &s );

One solution for writing a container is to write each element individually. This can be achieved using hyperslabs.

For example:

class WriteString
{
public:
  WriteString (hid_t dataset, hid_t datatype
      , hid_t dataspace, hid_t memspace)
    : m_dataset (dataset), m_datatype (datatype)
    , m_dataspace (dataspace), m_memspace (memspace)
    , m_pos () {}

private:
  hid_t m_dataset;
  hid_t m_datatype;
  hid_t m_dataspace;
  hid_t m_memspace;
  int m_pos;

//...

public:
  void operator ()(std::vector<std::string>::value_type const & v)
  {
    // Select the file position, 1 record at position 'pos'
    hsize_t count[] = { 1 } ;
    hsize_t offset[] = { m_pos++ } ;
    H5Sselect_hyperslab( m_dataspace
      , H5S_SELECT_SET
      , offset
      , NULL
      , count
      , NULL );

    const char * s = v.c_str ();
    H5Dwrite (m_dataset
      , m_datatype
      , m_memspace
      , m_dataspace
      , H5P_DEFAULT
      , &s );
    }    
};

// ...

void writeVector (hid_t group, std::vector<std::string> const & v)
{
  hsize_t     dims[] = { m_files.size ()  } ;
  hid_t dataspace = H5Screate_simple(sizeof(dims)/sizeof(*dims)
                                    , dims, NULL);

  dims[0] = 1;
  hid_t memspace = H5Screate_simple(sizeof(dims)/sizeof(*dims)
                                    , dims, NULL);

  hid_t datatype = H5Tcopy (H5T_C_S1);
  H5Tset_size (datatype, H5T_VARIABLE);

  hid_t dataset = H5Dcreate1 (group, "files", datatype
                             , dataspace, H5P_DEFAULT);

  // 
  // Select the "memory" to be written out - just 1 record.
  hsize_t offset[] = { 0 } ;
  hsize_t count[] = { 1 } ;
  H5Sselect_hyperslab( memspace, H5S_SELECT_SET, offset
                     , NULL, count, NULL );

  std::for_each (v.begin ()
      , v.end ()
      , WriteStrings (dataset, datatype, dataspace, memspace));

  H5Dclose (dataset);
  H5Sclose (dataspace);
  H5Sclose (memspace);
  H5Tclose (datatype);
}
share|improve this answer
    
You know what? HDF5 is one of those things I've always wanted to read and write. But procrastination being my middle name that hasn't materialized. Thanks to you I've decided to give it a more dedicated shot this time. I'd be very, very interested to know, where you are using this, if possible. –  dirkgently Feb 24 '09 at 16:05
    
We are looking to change how our static analysis tool stores the data that it gathers from its analysis. The data will contain tree like structures (scopes, types etc) and lists of diagnostics. At this stage I'm just evaluating how well HDF5 handles the different types of data. –  Richard Corden Feb 24 '09 at 17:28
    
This question (that I asked) outlines the kind of features that we are evaluating for: stackoverflow.com/questions/547195/… –  Richard Corden Feb 24 '09 at 17:33
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Here is some working code for writing a vector of variable length strings using the HDF5 c++ API.

I incorporate some of the suggestions in the other posts:

  1. use H5T_C_S1 and H5T_VARIABLE
  2. use string::c_str() to obtain pointers to the strings
  3. place the pointers into a vector of char* and pass to the HDF5 API

It is not necessary to create expensive copies of the string (e.g. with strdup()). c_str() returns a pointer to the null terminated data of the underlying string. This is precisely what the function is intended for. Of course, strings with embedded nulls will not work with this...

std::vector is guaranteed to have contiguous underlying storage, so using vector and vector::data() is the same as using raw arrays but is of course much neater and safer than the clunky, old-fashioned c way of doing things.

#include "H5Cpp.h"
void write_hdf5(H5::H5File file, const std::string& data_set_name,
                const std::vector<std::string>& strings )
{
    H5::Exception::dontPrint();

    try
    {
        // HDF5 only understands vector of char* :-(
        std::vector<const char*> arr_c_str;
        for (unsigned ii = 0; ii < strings.size(); ++ii) 
            arr_c_str.push_back(strings[ii].c_str());

        //
        //  one dimension
        // 
        hsize_t     str_dimsf[1] {arr_c_str.size()};
        H5::DataSpace   dataspace(1, str_dimsf);

        // Variable length string
        H5::StrType datatype(H5::PredType::C_S1, H5T_VARIABLE); 
        H5::DataSet str_dataset = file.createDataSet(data_set_name, datatype, dataspace);

        str_dataset.write(arr_c_str.data(), datatype);
    }
    catch (H5::Exception& err)
    {
        throw std::run_time_error(string("HDF5 Error in " ) 
                                    + err.getFuncName()
                                    + ": "
                                    + err.getDetailMsg());


    }
}
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If you are looking at cleaner code: I suggest you create a functor that'll take a string and save it to the HDF5 Container (in a desired mode). Richard, I used the wrong algorithm, please re-check!

std::for_each(v.begin(), v.end(), write_hdf5);

struct hdf5 : public std::unary_function<std::string, void> {
    hdf5() : _dataset(...) {} // initialize the HDF5 db
    ~hdf5() : _dataset(...) {} // close the the HDF5 db
    void operator(std::string& s) {
            // append 
            // use s.c_str() ?
    }
};

Does that help get started?

share|improve this answer
    
Well - yes I'm hoping to be able reach this kind of style - however, I wasn't sure if it was (a) possible and (b) efficient. Thanks for the answer. –  Richard Corden Feb 24 '09 at 10:30
    
I'm really very new to HDF5, so I have no idea what needs to be written where you have "// append". –  Richard Corden Feb 24 '09 at 10:41
    
I've only so much heard of HDF5. I meant by append whatever you are doing under the comment // Write the temporary container to a dataset. –  dirkgently Feb 24 '09 at 10:46
    
And this the crux of the problem. The "H5Dwrite" method takes a 'void*' argument and writes that, it's a bit like "memcpy" or "memmove" where you give it a size and a block of data. At least that's what I currently think! :) –  Richard Corden Feb 24 '09 at 10:51
    
So use your_data_string.c_str() and your_data_string.size(). void* is really a way of letting any kind of data pass-through. I wonder why you need the struct TempContainer though. –  dirkgently Feb 24 '09 at 10:54
show 9 more comments

I don't know about HDF5, but you can use

struct TempContainer {
    char* string;
};

and then copy the strings this way:

TempContainer t;
t.string = strdup(i->c_str());
tc.push_back (t);

This will allocate a string with the exact size, and also improves a lot when inserting or reading from the container (in your example there's an array copied, in this case only a pointer). You can also use std::vector:

std::vector<char *> tc;
...
tc.push_back(strdup(i->c_str());
share|improve this answer
    
Sure. Ideally I wouldn't need the temporary container at all. This code adds the slight disadvantage that the memory needs to be freed explicitly. –  Richard Corden Feb 24 '09 at 10:32
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Instead of a TempContainer, you can use a simple std::vector (you could also templatized it to match T -> basic_string . Something like this:

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <functional>

class StringToVector
  : std::unary_function<std::vector<char>, std::string> {
public:
  std::vector<char> operator()(const std::string &s) const {
    // assumes you want a NUL-terminated string
    const char* str = s.c_str();
    std::size_t size = 1 + std::strlen(str);
    // s.size() != strlen(s.c_str())
    std::vector<char> buf(&str[0], &str[size]);
    return buf;
  }
};

void conv(const std::vector<std::string> &vi,
          std::vector<std::vector<char> > &vo)
{
  // assert vo.size() == vi.size()
  std::transform(vi.begin(), vi.end(),
                 vo.begin(),
                 StringToVector());
}
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