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I am designing a database in Postgresql. I would like to know what are the pros and cons of using inheritance.

I would also like to know the following :

  1. Effects on database performance (i.e. insert,update,delete, indexing,etc) ?

  2. Does parent/child mean duplicated input [ internally ] ?

  3. Is it used commonly in Postgresql databases ?

  4. How is it better than using FK other than ease of use ?

  5. Should it be used with in reason to store generic and repetitive attributes that are used throughout the database (e.g. id, name, time stamps,etc)

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Do you mean using relations between your tables and inheritance between objects in your application code? –  Satadru Biswas Apr 28 '11 at 5:26
    
@Satadru: PostgreSQL supports table inheritance within the database. –  mu is too short Apr 28 '11 at 5:29
    
@mu nice information –  Satadru Biswas Apr 28 '11 at 5:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Effects on database performance (i.e. insert,update,delete, indexing,etc) ?

Not affected much because other techniques to reach the same result would also have an impact on performance.

Does parent/child mean duplicated input [ internally ] ?

You mean duplicated data? No.

Is it used commonly in Postgresql databases ?

Not that I know of, but to be fair that doesn't say that much.

How is it better than using FK other than ease of use ? It's usefullness should be determined on a case by case basis. Personally I have only used it for partitioning tables. It's ease of use can be deceiving when it makes other things hard. Constraints for instance don't apply to the parent and child table as a whole but are only for the table they are defined on, so a unique constraint might not do what you want.

Should it be used with in reason to store generic and repetitive attributes that are used throughout the database (e.g. id, name, time stamps,etc)

I don't think that is a good idea. Inheritance relationships should be meaningfull if it is only used to save you a little work now it will only serve to confuse you and others later.

Personally I use no table inheritance unless it solves a real problem. There are other methods that fit within the relation model to map class hierarchies to tables which work better or equally well for many use cases.

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I have to agree with you, it will confuse other users as well as other frameworks (esp. Django). –  Tahir Apr 28 '11 at 14:06

I have used table inheritance successfully, but only for common attributes needed by many tables, not for "class" inheritance.

Something like this:

CREATE TABLE base (
  uuid UUID NOT NULL DEFAULT uuid_generate_v4(),
  name VARCHAR(320) NOT NULL,
  updated_by UUID NOT NULL DEFAULT uuid_nil(),
  updated TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT current_timestamp
);

CREATE TABLE child (
  childata TEXT NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
)
INHERITS (base);

Where I use base to hold data needed by a number of tables. Note that I don't actually put anything in the base table (enforced by revoking all privileges). Each child table stores its own uuid, name, etc. This method really just saves copy/paste. This may not be a huge savings since each child table still needs to have PKs, FKs & indexes defined separately.

The downside of this is that you can't do queries by name across all tables without unions. If you are trying to do class inheritance this may be a requirement.

Something like person with an employee subclass may be better modeled as a a person table with common data and an employee table with 'subclass' data that has a 1-to-1 link to person. This should perform pretty well since you would be joining by PK. Searches would query the person table and then you can do outer joins for employee data (using NULL to imply person vs employee).

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After having taken a brief look in the piece of tutorial mu pointed to,

"Effects on database performance (i.e. insert,update,delete, indexing,etc) ?"

Performance considerations were probably the very reason why the construct was invented.

"Does parent/child mean duplicated input [ internally ] ?"

Presumably not. It looks more like the internal implementation will be based on things like ROWID(). I would go that way if I had to implement such a feature, and I doubt any DBMS engineer would think differently.

"How is it better than using FK other than ease of use ?"

I would stay away from it and use "proper" design with FKs. "Ease of use" might be a quality of this inheritance technique that exists only if you look at it superficially enough. I expect there will be many unpleasant surprises lurking under the surface such as the few ones documented at the end of the tutorial. The one about key declarations that would still allow duplicate rows, as far as I understand it, is just a killer for me. I mean, keys that allow duplicates, how insane can you get ?

Another reason I'd stay away from this is that I don't know for sure whether or not this is standard SQL.

"Should it be used with in reason ..."

If keys are no longer declarations of uniqueness, the only thing I can wonder is where all the reason has gone.

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