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So for example, I have a static variable inside a recursive function, and I want that variable to be static through out each call of the recursion, but once the recursion is finished, I want that variable to be reset so that the next time I use the recursive function it starts from scratch.

For example, we have a function:

<?php
function someFunction() {
    static $variable = null;
    do stuff; change value of $variable; do stuff;
    someFunction(); # The value of $variable persists through the recursion.
    return ($variable);
}
?>

We can call the function for the first time like this: someFunction(); and it will work fine. Then we call it again: someFunction(); but this time it starts with the previous value for $variable. How can we reset it after the recursion of the first time we called the function so that the second time we call it it is like starting over fresh?

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I am not sure I understand your question but if you don't want the variables value to persist though recursion then just remove the static. –  austinbv Apr 28 '11 at 2:42
    
I want it to persist through recursion... I don't want it to persist when I call the function manually by typing it in the source code. –  trusktr Apr 28 '11 at 2:43
1  
This is why we don't use static variables for recursion. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 28 '11 at 2:44
    
Thanks everyone who answered! Those are all nice, but different, ways of doing the same thing. ;) –  trusktr Apr 28 '11 at 2:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Prodigitalsons answer is the best solution, but since you asked for a solution using static variables and I don't see an appropriate answer here's my solution.

Just set the static variable to null when you're done. The following will print 12345 on both calls.

function someFunction() {
    static $variable = 0;
    $variable++;
    echo $variable;
    if ($variable < 5) someFunction();

    $returnValue = $variable;
    $variable = null;
    return $returnValue;
}
someFunction();
echo "\n";
someFunction();
echo "\n";

Or combine this with the previous answer with an initializer:

function someFunction($initValue = 0) {
    static $variable = 0;
    if($initValue !== 0) {
        $variable = $initValue;    
    }
    $variable++;
    echo $variable;
    if ($variable < 5) someFunction();

    $returnValue = $variable;
    $variable = null;
    return $returnValue;
}

someFunction(2);
echo "\n";
someFunction(3);
echo "\n";
someFunction();
echo "\n";
someFunction(-2);

Will output:

345
45
12345
-1012345
share|improve this answer
    
Beware that both these examples work "by chance" because the initialization takes place only once per script execution but --luckily-- null is cast to 0 by $variable++. –  Ando Dec 5 at 17:38
    
You're right, that's exactly what happens. This shouldn't be the accepted answer in that case. –  Bas Dec 8 at 11:14

The simplest thing to do is pass the variable as an argument. I wouldnt really mess with static here.

function someFunction($value = null) {
    do stuff; change value of $value; do stuff;
    someFunction($value); # The value of $variable persists through the recursion.
    return $value;
}

As a general rule you should have to pass the arguments to the function (unless they operate on class properties within the same class)... they shouldnt be global and in the case of recursion its probably not a good idea to make them static... Treat a function like a black box... values go in... they get stuff done with/to them and a result comes out. They shouldnt be aware of things happening elsewhere. There are some exceptions, but IMO they are very few.

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I agree that static variables have very few use cases. However, today I discovered a nice one: Track the number of the current replacement in the callback passed to preg_replace_callback. Beware that you probably need to re-init the static counter inside the callback, for example before exiting the last replacement. –  Ando Dec 5 at 17:48

Ok, well I see prodigitalson squirreled me on the answer. Here's a demo:

http://codepad.org/4R0bZf1B

<?php
function someFunction($varset = NULL) {
    static $variable = NULL;
    if ($varset !== NULL) $variable = $varset;
    $variable++;
    echo $variable;
    if ($variable < 5) someFunction();
    return $variable;
}

someFunction(4);
echo "\n";
someFunction(2);
echo "\n";
someFunction(3);

?>

Outputs:

5
345
45
share|improve this answer
    
+1... but i am not a squirrel sir! –  prodigitalson Apr 28 '11 at 2:55
    
Ha ha. If you live anywhere near a pecan tree, you know the squirrel always gets to the nut first. –  Jared Farrish Apr 28 '11 at 2:56
    
<homer-simpson> mmmmm candied pecans </homer-simpson> –  prodigitalson Apr 28 '11 at 3:13
    
But if you call the function without an argument the variable will never reset. So subsequent calls of someFunction() will print 6 7 8 etc... –  Bas Nov 28 at 8:58
    
See my comment stackoverflow.com/questions/5812953/… . –  Ando Dec 5 at 17:54

I found a solution:

<?php
function someFunction($clear_static = false) {
    static $variable = null;
    if ($clear_static) {
        $variable = null;
    }
    do stuff; change value of $variable; do stuff;
    someFunction(); # The value of $variable persists through the recursion.
    return ($variable);
}

someFunction(); # first manual call.
someFunction(); # second manual call, $variable has value from previous use.
someFunction(true); # third manual call, value of $variable starts like new.
?>
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, this looks... familiar. –  Jared Farrish Apr 28 '11 at 2:59
1  
notice how you could replace keyword static with keyword global and it would work the same =( –  tereško Apr 28 '11 at 3:01
    
hehe, yeah. Its similar to one of the answers! haha! So what happens when $varset is NULL and you do a ++$variable in your answer? –  trusktr Sep 3 '11 at 12:09

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