Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When doing a git diff it says "No newline at end of file".

What exactly is this message trying to tell us?

(Like am I missing out on something? Why is this so important?)

share|improve this question
    
Perhaps, if you have a file that ends without a newline, and you add another line, git would have to show that the former last line has changed, since it includes the newline character as part of the line? –  nafg Apr 13 at 21:20
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 113 down vote accepted

It indicates that you do not have a newline (usually '\n', aka CR or CRLF) at the end of file.

That is, simply speaking, the last byte (or bytes if you're on Windows) in the file is not a newline.

The message is displayed because otherwise there is no way to tell the difference between a file where there is a newline at the end and one where is not. Diff has to output a newline anyway, or the result would be harder to read or process automatically.

Note that it is a good style to always put the newline as a last character if it is allowed by the file format. Furthermore, for example, for C and C++ header files it is required by the language standard.

share|improve this answer
41  
Out of curiosity, can you explain why it's considered good style to always put a newline as the last character? Edit: found this discussion. –  Paul Bellora Nov 16 '12 at 20:27
1  
Manifest files for JAR files also require a new line at the end of a file. See docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/deployment/jar/modman.html –  CookieMonster Jan 21 at 21:10
add comment

It just indicates that the end of the file doesn't have a newline. It's not a catastrophe it's just a message to make it clearer that there isn't one when looking at a diff in the command line.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The core problem is what you define line and whether end-on-line character sequence is part of the line or not. UNIX-based editors (such as VIM) or tools (such as Git) use EOL character sequence as line terminator, therefore it's a part of the line. It's similar to use of semicolon (;) in C and Pascal. In C semicolon terminates statements, in Pascal it separates them.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you add a new line at the end of the existing file which is not having a newline at the end already, the diff will show old last line also as modified, when conceptually its not.

At least one good reason to add a newline at the end.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.