Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The first paragraph of [class.derived] says of base class specifiers,

If the name found is not a class-name, the program is ill-formed.

However, a simple test shows that Comeau and g++ -ansi -pedantic both accept a typedef-name as a base. A simple grep -r '[^:]: mpl' over the Boost headers shows that popular library often relies on such behavior.

Has any compiler ever actually rejected a typedef of a class in a base specifier? GCC even checks that the base class type is not const, which refines the nonstandard functionality.

Is there a workaround? The only thing I can think of is to replace the typedef with a C++11 alias template. A templated alias-declaration declares a template-name which may then become a class-name… I think. This may require a dummy parameter to the alias-declaration.

Perhaps the Standard should be adjusted to match the unanimous behavior of the compilers. Is there a DR?

share|improve this question
    
For the record: DR 484 Can a base-specifier name a cv-qualified class type? points at C++11 §9.1/5: "If a typedef-name that names a cv-qualified class type is used where a class-name is required, the cv-qualifiers are ignored." So, this is a GCC bug. –  Potatoswatter Apr 28 '11 at 6:41
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I believe this is in accordance with the standard. Specifically, §9.1/5: "A typedef-name (7.1.3) that names a class is a class-name, [...]".

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Perfect answer! –  Prasoon Saurav Apr 28 '11 at 4:18
    
Hah! I only looked up the constructive definition of class-name. Thanks! (Grr, must wait one minute.) –  Potatoswatter Apr 28 '11 at 4:19
    
Now, that raises the question of what is supposed to happen with a const-qualified base class type… time for more digging… –  Potatoswatter Apr 28 '11 at 4:21
    
@Potatoswatter: the standard must be viewed holistically -- which means only those who've memorized the whole blasted thing can ever be entirely sure of anything (and of course nobody's memorized it all)! –  Jerry Coffin Apr 28 '11 at 4:25
1  
@Potatoswatter: as good as Johannes is (and he definitely is good) I'm pretty sure he doesn't know it quite as well as Andrew Koenig (former editor) or Pete Becker (current editor). It's so big, most of the authors don't remember all the parts they personally wrote! I sent in some minor edits once (but a lot less than most committee members have written) and I don't even remember all the parts I wrote... –  Jerry Coffin Apr 28 '11 at 4:36
show 5 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.