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When I provide a constructor for class A, I don't get the unreferenced local variable why? What does the empty constructor do to eliminate the warning?

class A
{
public:
   A() {}
};

int main()
{
   A a;
}
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Which compiler are you using? –  Jacob Apr 28 '11 at 4:35
    
@Jacob: VC++ Compiler with warning flag: /W3 –  user32234 Apr 28 '11 at 4:56

2 Answers 2

This is only a theory, but because a constructor may contain code that can cause side effects, someone may decide to construct an unused object just to run that code. If you have no constructor and never reference an object that you've constructed, then it can safely be determined that the object has no purpose.

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Some source on that? –  GeorgeAl Apr 28 '11 at 4:34
    
@Muggen: "This is only a theory..." –  GManNickG Apr 28 '11 at 4:34
    
Only a theory, but it makes logical sense. Would be interesting to look at the source of the compiler (if it's an open source compiler the OP is using) –  Jacob Apr 28 '11 at 4:35
    
The Visual C++ compiler (which is the compiler I assume the OP is using based on the warning text) isn't open source, but your explanation makes the most sense. The official documentation says that adding a constructor will "silence" the warning in this specific case. –  In silico Apr 28 '11 at 4:43

For example if A is something that holds a mutex lock (and release the lock when destructed), then this code

int main()
{
    A a;
    // other actions
}

is able to keep this function thread-safe, even a does not be referenced.

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