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I have a procedure declared like so:

procedure MyProc(List: Array of string);

I want to know how to check if the List parameter is empty.

For example:

procedure MyProc(List: Array of string);
begin
  if List=[] then // here I want to check if the List array is empty
  //do something
  else 
  //do something else
end;

How I can do this?

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3  
You should have written MyProc(const List: array of string) because in your code, all strings are copied into a temporary array before calling the MyProc procedure. And if pointer(List)=nil then is the fastest way to check that a dynamic array is empty. –  Arnaud Bouchez Apr 28 '11 at 6:46
1  
pointer(list) abandons type-safety and relies on implementation detail –  David Heffernan Apr 28 '11 at 15:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

you can use the Length function

procedure MyProc(List: Array of string);
begin
  if Length(List)=0 then // is empty ?
  //do something
  else 
  // do something else
end;
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Empty arrays are equal to nil:

if List = nil then // it's empty

(That also means SetLength(List, 0) and List := nil are equivalent commands.)

Empty arrays have a last index that's less than the first index, which for the open array in your example means having a negative last index:

if High(List) < 0 then // it's empty

That means that if you want to avoid running a loop on an empty array, you don't have to do anything special. Just write the loop as you normally would:

for i := Low(List) to High(List) do // won't run if List is empty
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are you sure about if List = nil then? this line does not compile. –  RRUZ Apr 28 '11 at 6:25
    
if pointer(List)=nil then is the fastest way to check that a dynamic array is empty (fastest than length(List)=0) –  Arnaud Bouchez Apr 28 '11 at 6:44
2  
@RRUZ: that is because List = nil works only for dynamic arrays (like in the title of this question), but not for open arrays (like in the example of this question). The poster is mixing dynamic and open arrays. –  The_Fox Apr 28 '11 at 6:45
    
I don't like the idea of using Assigned(List) or any other variation on that theme to check if an array is empty. Compare for example the TList class. There's a significantly different meaning between MyTList = nil and MyTList.Count = 0. As much as something that doesn't exist cannot have any items - the fact that it doesn't exist can be a significant error. So I'd rather stick with Length(List), and better yet for I := Low(List) to High(List) with the advantage that it's the same for all three kinds of arrays. (+1 anycase for: "won't run if List is empty") –  Craig Young Apr 28 '11 at 17:29

Personally I always write

if Assigned(List) then

rather than

if List<>nil then

because I believe it reads better, and not just for dynamic arrays.


That answers the question for dynamic arrays, but your example is an open array, so there are two possible questions here.

For open arrays I would use Length() or high() to take decision based on the size of the array. I would not be seduced by arguments that Pointer(List)<>nil is quicker than Length(List)<>nil. The difference in speed between these options will not be discernible and so you should use the most clear and readable option.

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I agree. This is more Delphi-like than the alternative. +1 –  0xC0000022L Apr 28 '11 at 12:11
1  
I don't like the idea of using Assigned(List) or any other variation on that theme to check if an array is empty. Compare for example the TList class. There's a significantly different meaning between MyTList = nil and MyTList.Count = 0. As much as something that doesn't exist cannot have any items - the fact that it doesn't exist can be a significant error. So I'd rather stick with Length(List), and better yet for I := Low(List) to High(List) with the advantage that it's the same for all three kinds of arrays. –  Craig Young Apr 28 '11 at 17:26
    
@Craig In practice I don't think one would easily get dynamic arrays and objects mixed up but I do take your point. –  David Heffernan Apr 28 '11 at 17:33

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