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String.Format and StringBuilder (via the AppendFormat method) allow callers to pump values into a string they have prepared, e.g:

string temp = string.Format("Item {0} of {1}, Record Id: {2} started...",
  itemCounter.ToString(),
  totalItemsToProcess.ToString(),
  myRecord.RecordId);
MyMethod(temp);

But rather than build a string and pass that into "MyMethod()" I'd rather have an overload that people called like this:

MyMethod("Item {0} of {1}, Record Id: {2} started...",
  itemCounter.ToString(),
  totalItemsToProcess.ToString(),
  myRecord.RecordId);

How would you implement that? Is there something I can leverage or do I have to write a bunch of custom code?

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Why you need MyMethod? I think string.format is more clear... –  ArsenMkrt Apr 28 '11 at 5:53
    
Why reinvent the wheel ? –  V4Vendetta Apr 28 '11 at 6:03
2  
#ArsenMkrt, MyMethod() is purely pseudo code. I need to provide a method that accepts what is basically a string but a lot of the time there will be a variety of information to pump into it. Allowing callers to use a string.format type overload makes usage easier and the rest of the code cleaner. –  Adrian K Apr 28 '11 at 6:28
    
#V4Vendetta, for ease of use and to keep code cleaner. BTW, I would see it as not too dissimilar to the AppendFormat() method on StringBuilder - which I'm guessing (with the greatest respect) you wouldn't call reinvention? –  Adrian K Apr 28 '11 at 6:31
    
Interesting observation: in the question code I never said MyMethod() returned anything - but all code examples have MyMethod returninga a string. Not a critism - just interesting :) –  Adrian K Apr 28 '11 at 6:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's pretty trivial, but there are less trivial uses of params:

static string MyMethod( string format, params object[] paramList )
{
    return string.Format(format, paramList);
}
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Thanks for the example. Params is it; my thanks to the others who provided links :) –  Adrian K Apr 28 '11 at 6:34

How about params? http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/w5zay9db.aspx

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Ah - spot on. I knew there was an easy way. –  Adrian K Apr 28 '11 at 6:33

Look into params

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Sorry RedDeckWins - CharithJ bet you by 2 mins. –  Adrian K Apr 28 '11 at 6:39
    
I answered 44 minutes ago, which means my answer was before a 38 or 42 minute ago answer... if you hover over the "x minutes ago" you can see the time it was posted. –  RedDeckWins Apr 28 '11 at 6:40
    
Yes - I am a dufus. –  Adrian K Apr 28 '11 at 6:58

You can create a method and use String.Format inside, probably something like this:

private void MyMethod(string separator, params string[] strings)
{
      string concatenatedString = String.Format(separator, strings);

      //More processing
}
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I don's see the reason why you want to write your method in this case, but here how you can do that

public string MyMethod(string s, params object[] args)
{
     return string.Format(s,args);
}
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