Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have class implementing Runnable:

public class Abc implements Runnable{
    public synchronized void run(){
        while(!(Thread.currentThread().isInterrupted() || someCondition())){
           doSomething();
           try{
               this.wait(SOME_TIME);
           } catch(InterruptedException ex){
            logger.error("Ex",ex);
            Thread.currentThread.interrupt();
               }
}}}

After submiting it to threadpool I would like to cancel it, with interrupt.

futureTask.cancel(true);

But today my Runnable object stopped receiving interrupt. I've logged out interrupt state : false. InterruptedException is not thrown. Any suggestions what is wrong?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

My guess is that the interrupt was consumed by doSomething or doSomething was tied up (not returning)

Using wait() in a loop like this suggest to me that you have a control flow which would be better suited to using the Concurrency libraries. Can you give some more details as to what you are waiting for?

BTW, If you move the try/cath to outside the loop it would simplify it.

share|improve this answer
    
I am doing some calculations before updating progress bar (with SwingUtilities.invokeLater). Then I wait 400ms and do it again until I set 100% or user clicks cancel. Moving try catch outside while didn't help, doSomething() is not catching any exceptions itself. –  teodozjan Apr 28 '11 at 8:09
    
After calling interrupt() can you call getStackTrace() on the thread to see what it is doing? –  Peter Lawrey Apr 28 '11 at 8:16

First you snippet doesn't even compile: you are lacking braces, Thread.currentThread is a method not an instance variable. Then, are you calling Thread.interrupted() in your doSomething method? If yes: it clears the interrupted state of a thread, so that wait won't be interrupted and currentThread().isInterrupted() will return false.

You also don't need to recheck interrupted state in the while clause or reinterrupt the thread once it got iterrupted. This looks nicer (and catches exception that your doSomething might throw):

  public synchronized void run() {
    try {
      while (!someCondition()) {
        doSomething();
        wait(SOME_TIME);
      }
    } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
      logger.error(ie);
    } catch (Exception e) {
      logger.error(e);
    }
  }

@Peter: moving try/catch around while is definitely a good suggestion!

share|improve this answer
    
I was writting while hungry... sorry. I edited my post. No, I am not calling Thread.interrupted(). –  teodozjan Apr 28 '11 at 8:13
    
print a message at the end of the run method, is it still running while you trying to interrupt it? –  Tomasz Stanczak Apr 28 '11 at 9:49
    
It is very weird because it looks like while is not coming back (not displaying logger after leaving while loop but still displaying logger in someCondition), although newly submitted tasks are executed. –  teodozjan Apr 28 '11 at 10:33
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Solved

This was actually very tricky race condition. I've been starting task from gui thread and cancelling it from network reader thread. I cannot explain why log4j didn't display loggers but better thread control resolved my issue. Your answers helped me to track an idea to solve it, thanks.

When something worked yesterday but not today - probably its race condition or deadlock. :-)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.