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I am trying to build an interpreter for the Icon programming language, in Scala. Right now I am working on setting up a parser for it.

The code I have written so far is:

package interpreter
import scala.util.parsing.combinator.syntactical._
import scala.util.parsing.combinator.RegexParsers
import scala.util.parsing.combinator.PackratParsers
import scala.util.parsing.combinator.JavaTokenParsers

object ExprParser extends JavaTokenParsers with PackratParsers{

def exp : Parser[expr] =
    andexp |
    fail |
    ifexp |
    fromTo |
    write |
    string |
    arithm |
    "(" ~> exp <~ ")" |
    exp

def integer : Parser[CstInt] = wholeNumber ^^ { s => { //println("matching int");
new CstInt(s.toInt)}}
def string : Parser[CstStr] = stringLiteral ^^ { s => { //println("matching string");
new CstStr(s)}}


def fail : Parser[Fail] = "&fail" ^^ { e => Fail()}

def  write : Parser[Write] =  "write" ~> "(" ~> exp <~ ")" ^^ {  e => Write(e)}

def ifexp : Parser[If] = ("if" ~> exp) ~ ("then" ~> exp) ~ ("else" ~> exp) ^^ { case cond ~ suc ~ fail => If(cond, suc, fail)}


// Arithmetic
def arithm : Parser[expr] =
    term ~ ("+" ~> arithm) ^^ { case l ~ r => Prim("+", l, r)} |
    term ~ ("-" ~> arithm) ^^{ case l ~ r => Prim("-", l, r)} |
    term

def term : Parser[expr] =
    factor ~ ("*" ~> term) ^^ { case l ~ r => Prim("*", l, r)} |
    factor ~ ("/" ~> term) ^^ { case l ~ r => Prim("/", l, r)} |
    factor

def factor : Parser[expr] =
    integer |
    "-" ~> arithm |
    "(" ~> arithm <~ ")"


//PackratParser to allow left recursive grammars
lazy val fromTo : PackratParser[FromTo] = exp ~ ("to" ~> exp) ^^ { case from ~ to => FromTo(from, to)}

lazy val andexp : PackratParser[And] = exp ~ ("&" ~> exp) ^^ { case e1 ~ e2 =>{ println("matching and" + e1); println(" arg2: " + e2); And(e1, e2)}}

def parseInput(input: String) : expr =
    parseAll (exp, input) match {
        case Success(tree, _) => tree
        case e: NoSuccess => throw new IllegalArgumentException(e.toString())
    }
}

Now, my problem is that when I run this code on this input:

write(1 to 5) & write(3 to 5)

I get the following output:

matching andWrite(FromTo(CstInt(1),CstInt(5)))
arg2: Write(FromTo(CstInt(3),CstInt(5)))
matching andWrite(FromTo(CstInt(1),CstInt(5)))
arg2: Write(FromTo(CstInt(3),CstInt(5)))
java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: [1.30] failure: `&' expected but `' found

write(1 to 5) & write(3 to 5)
                             ^
at interpreter.ExprParser$.parseInput(parser.scala:62)
at interpreter.Main$.main(main.scala:9)
at interpreter.Main.main(main.scala)
at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:39)
at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:25)
at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:597)
at sbt.Run.run0(Run.scala:60)
at sbt.Run.execute$1(Run.scala:47)
at sbt.Run$$anonfun$run$2.apply(Run.scala:50)
at sbt.Run$$anonfun$run$2.apply(Run.scala:50)
at sbt.TrapExit$.executeMain$1(TrapExit.scala:33)
at sbt.TrapExit$$anon$1.run(TrapExit.scala:42)

I added the printouts as a way of seeing whether it even matched the & operator.

The code runs fine on other weird inputs like:

write((if &fail then 3 else 5) to (3 to 5))

So it seems to be a problem specifically related to the andexp parser.

Any help would be much appreciated, as I am completely new to Scala and the parser combinators, and it is somewhat hard to find good documentation I think.

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3 Answers 3

Could this be due to the cycle in def exp = ... | exp?

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Hmm, the cycle in itself should not be a problem, but I think actually I was allowing left recursion with the andexp. I just tried making exp a packratparser, and this seems to have solved the problem. What I fail to see is why fromTo would work, when andexp did not. –  ChrKroer Apr 28 '11 at 7:30
    
I also wondered if it should be a PackratParser and also too fromTo as an existence proof that it didn't matter. If you solved your own problem feel free to post an answer explaining it and mark it correct. –  Ben Jackson Apr 28 '11 at 7:33
    
Alright, I'll do that and post the working code later, I have to wait 8 hours because I'm a new user. –  ChrKroer Apr 28 '11 at 7:57
    
@ChrKroer This cycle is probably not a problem, but is also meaningless. And exp can be an exp? What could it possible do that is useful? –  Daniel C. Sobral Apr 28 '11 at 15:58
    
I agree, that exp at the end is useless. However I do think the problem was a cycle, as I mentioned in my first comment, with the andexp and exp creating left recursion. –  ChrKroer May 3 '11 at 13:50

Note that packrat parsers have limitations with regard to left recursion. And mixing packrat with non-packrat on a mutal recursive rule is way strange. I have no idea how that would work (or not), and I'd just avoid finding out.

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It seems to be working fine so far. Could you clarify on why it could be a problem? Are you suggesting that I go packrat only then? –  ChrKroer Apr 28 '11 at 17:26
    
@ChrKroer you might wish to talk to the packrat people, as they might clarify whether it might be a problem or not. I just would never expect them to be mixable. –  Daniel C. Sobral Apr 28 '11 at 18:14
1  
They can definitely be mixed, unless I'm doing something unusual that I am not aware of: "Important: using PackratParsers is not an all or nothing decision. They can be free mixed with regular Parsers in a single grammar." Taken from: scala-lang.org/archives/downloads/distrib/files/nightly/docs/… –  ChrKroer Apr 28 '11 at 19:33
up vote 0 down vote accepted

So, as mentioned in my comment on Ben Jacksons answer, the problem was that I needed to make exp a PackratParser, the working code is here:

package interpreter
import scala.util.parsing.combinator.syntactical._
import scala.util.parsing.combinator.RegexParsers
import scala.util.parsing.combinator.PackratParsers
import scala.util.parsing.combinator.JavaTokenParsers

object ExprParser extends JavaTokenParsers with PackratParsers{

lazy val exp : PackratParser[expr] =
    andexp |
    fail |
    ifexp |
    fromTo |
    write |
    string |
    arithm |
    "(" ~> exp <~ ")" 

def integer : Parser[CstInt] = wholeNumber ^^ { s => { //println("matching int");
new CstInt(s.toInt)}}
def string : Parser[CstStr] = stringLiteral ^^ { s => { //println("matching string");
new CstStr(s)}}


def fail : Parser[Fail] = "&fail" ^^ { e => Fail()}

def  write : Parser[Write] =  "write" ~> "(" ~> exp <~ ")" ^^ {  e => Write(e)}

def ifexp : Parser[If] = ("if" ~> exp) ~ ("then" ~> exp) ~ ("else" ~> exp) ^^ { case cond ~ suc ~ fail => If(cond, suc, fail)}


// Arithmetic
def arithm : Parser[expr] =
    term ~ ("+" ~> arithm) ^^ { case l ~ r => Prim("+", l, r)} |
    term ~ ("-" ~> arithm) ^^{ case l ~ r => Prim("-", l, r)} |
    term

def term : Parser[expr] =
    factor ~ ("*" ~> term) ^^ { case l ~ r => Prim("*", l, r)} |
    factor ~ ("/" ~> term) ^^ { case l ~ r => Prim("/", l, r)} |
    factor

def factor : Parser[expr] =
    integer |
    "-" ~> arithm |
    "(" ~> arithm <~ ")"


//PackratParser to allow left recursive grammars
lazy val fromTo : PackratParser[FromTo] = exp ~ ("to" ~> exp) ^^ { case from ~ to => FromTo(from, to)}

lazy val andexp : PackratParser[And] = exp ~ ("&" ~> exp) ^^ { case e1 ~ e2 =>{ println("matching and" + e1); println(" arg2: " + e2); And(e1, e2)}}

def parseInput(input: String) : expr =
    parseAll (exp, input) match {
        case Success(tree, _) => tree
        case e: NoSuccess => throw new IllegalArgumentException(e.toString())
    }
}

With my previous code I seem to have been allowing for left recursion, which cannot be handled by the normal parser. If anyone can clarify why fromTo was working without exp being a PackratParser, while andexp was not, I would still be interested to hear why that is so.

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