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I came across on a strange behavior of the following code, while playing around with initialization of ints using g++ 4.4.3.

  int main()

    {

        int x(int());

        int y = int();

        cout << x << "  " << y <<  endl;
    }

the result is:

1 0

The value of "y" is 0 as expected, but the value of x is strangely "1"!

On VS2008 yields the following link error (a function declaration, but without definition):

unresolved external symbol "int __cdecl x(int (__cdecl*)(void))"

Can anyone explain this strange behavior of g++?

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2  
@Skavcho, good question. x is interpreted as function declaration. You can try rather int x(*new int());. It will give you expected result as 0 0. –  iammilind Apr 28 '11 at 7:40
4  
@iammilind: Yes but it will leak. –  Benoit Apr 28 '11 at 7:46
7  
@Benoit: Yes, every time main() is called... –  Ben Jackson Apr 28 '11 at 7:47
3  
@Ben Jackson: don't belittle Benoit's answer so simply. This code snippet is only a code example, meant to have the smallest executive program possible. However the answer to the question will be used in the midst of real code. So yes it's important NOT to leak. –  Matthieu M. Apr 28 '11 at 8:29
2  
As @Jan said - this would do the job: int x((int())); –  Slavcho Ivanov Apr 28 '11 at 8:36

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

To complement GMan's answer here (x is a function definition) as to why the 1.

The reason for the output to be 1 is that at the place of call std::cout << x, the function decays into a pointer to the function (the language does not allow you to pass functions as arguments to other functions, so as with arrays an implicit conversion to pointer-to is performed). Now, there is no overload of an ostream that takes a function pointer, and the compiler tries to select a conversion to any of the available overloads. At that point it finds that the best conversion sequence is to bool and it prints 1 (the pointer is not 0).

You can check this by changing the behavior, you can use std::cout << std::boolalpha << x, and that will print true instead of 1. Also, it is interesting to note that VS is right with this one, as the expression std::cout << x requires taking the address of x, then the function is used and the program is ill-formed if there is no definition for that function. You can again check that by providing a definition:

int f() {}
int main() {
   int x(int());      // 1
   x( &f );           // 2
}
int x( int(*)() ) {   // 3
   std::cout << "In x" << std::endl;
}

Where I have manually performed the conversion from function to pointer-to-function in the definition of x (1) and the call with the argument f (2) --note that the declaration in 1 and the definition in 3 are the same signature, and that the & in x( &f ) will be performed by the compiler if you don't do it.

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int x(int()); is parsed as function declaration.

It declares a function named x, returning an int and accepting one parameter, which has the type of a function returning an int and accepting no arguments.

This is known as the most vexing parse.

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And why "its value" (not the quotes ) is 1 ? Isn't it supposed to be a address of a function of something? (+1, btw) –  Kiril Kirov Apr 28 '11 at 7:40
    
Most vexing parse? No love for misinterpretation of X<Y<Z>>? –  Ben Jackson Apr 28 '11 at 7:40
    
@Ben - I'd agree with GMan, as X<Y<Z>> is pretty obvious and (already) well-known, while this declaration of function is not that "familiar" –  Kiril Kirov Apr 28 '11 at 7:42
1  
It's 1 because: stackoverflow.com/questions/2064692/… –  Ben Jackson Apr 28 '11 at 7:43
1  
@Ben, others: most vexing parse first pubished in 1992 by Scott Meyers. (all of C++ parsing is mildly vexing, but there can only be one Ivan The Terrible too) –  sehe Apr 28 '11 at 7:49

Just add more parens:

int main()

    {

        int x((int()));

        int y = int();

        cout << x << "  " << y <<  endl;
    }

Now x is an int, not a function.

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As others have said, x is a function declaration. Since there is no predefined ostream inserter defined for function pointer types, g++ appears to using the implicit bool conversion (used for checking if a function pointer is NULL) to find a way to output it.

Visual C++, on the other hand, is complaining that the declared function x is never defined, and thus it can't complete the link. I suspect g++ in this case is smart enough to see that the function is never called, and thus doesn't worry about the link.

You might try adding a dummy definition of the function int x(int(*)()) { return 0xdeadbeef; } to the code and see what MSVC does with it then.

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C++ interprets the first one as the declaration of a function.

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This

int x(int());

Is actually a function declaration the input is a function of following signature

int fn(void)

The function pointer passed to std::cout << is converted to a bool(1) as it is a non-NULL pointer.

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