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I have a table some_table like

+--------+----------+---------------------+-------+
| id     | other_id | date_value          | value |
+--------+----------+---------------------+-------+
| 1      | 1        | 2011-04-20 21:03:05 | 104   |
| 2      | 2        | 2011-04-20 21:03:04 | 229   |
| 3      | 3        | 2011-04-20 21:03:03 | 130   |
| 4      | 1        | 2011-04-20 21:02:09 | 97    |
| 5      | 2        | 2011-04-20 21:02:08 | 65    |
| 6      | 3        | 2011-04-20 21:02:07 | 101   |
| ...    | ...      | ...                 | ...   |
+--------+----------+---------------------+-------+

And I want the latest records for the other_id 1, 2, and 3. The obvious query I came up with is

SELECT id, other_id, MAX(date_value), value
  FROM some_table 
 WHERE other_id IN (1, 2, 3) 
 GROUP BY other_id

However it spits a "not a GROUP BY expression" exception. I tried adding all other fields (i.e. id, value) in the GROUP BY clause, but that just returns everything, exactly as if there was no GROUP BY clause. (Well, it does make sense too.)

So... I'm reading the Oracle SQL manual, and all I can find are some examples involving only queries with two or three columns and some i-have-never-seen-before grouping functions. How do I go and return

+--------+----------+---------------------+-------+
| id     | other_id | date_value          | value |
+--------+----------+---------------------+-------+
| 1      | 1        | 2011-04-20 21:03:05 | 104   |
| 2      | 2        | 2011-04-20 21:03:04 | 229   |
| 3      | 3        | 2011-04-20 21:03:03 | 130   |
+--------+----------+---------------------+-------+

(the latest entries for each other_id) ? Thank you.

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
 select id, other_id, date_value, value from
 (
   SELECT id, other_id, date_value, value, 
   ROW_NUMBER() OVER (partition by other_id order BY Date_Value desc) r
   FROM some_table 
   WHERE other_id IN (1, 2, 3) 
 )
 where r = 1
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excellent! this works like a charm! –  Yanick Rochon Apr 28 '11 at 8:19
    
Why not use the MAX aggregate? –  Benoit Apr 28 '11 at 8:22
    
@Benoit, the order by date_value desc does the same thing –  Yanick Rochon Apr 28 '11 at 8:32
1  
@Yanick Rochon: Yes, but sorting always has a cost. Probably using MAX is more efficient. –  Benoit Apr 28 '11 at 9:11
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You cannot SELECT any column that is not either an aggregate or computed from only the columns used in the GROUP BY clause.

However there are three ways to do it:

  • You can use analytic functions

    SELECT id, other_id, date_value, value
      FROM ( SELECT id, other_id, date_value, MAX(date_value) OVER (partition by other_id) max_date, value
               FROM some_table )
     WHERE max_date = date_value;
    
  • You can use a self join with a “greater than ” clause and detect your max this way

    SELECT t1.id, t1.other_id, t1.date_value, t1.value
      FROM some_table t1
      LEFT OUTER JOIN some_table t2
                   ON ( t1.other_id = t2.other_id AND t2.date_value > t1.date_value )
     WHERE t2.other_id IS NULL
    
  • You can use a subquery

      WITH max AS ( SELECT other_id, MAX(date_value) FROM some_table GROUP BY other_id )
    SELECT id, other_id, date_value, value
      FROM some_table
     WHERE ( other_id, date_value ) IN ( SELECT * FROM max )
    
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the first query ends with a max_date not a valid identifier –  Yanick Rochon Apr 28 '11 at 8:29
    
@Yanick Rochon: yes, actually this query should be nested also. I will rewrite it a bit. Do the other queries work? –  Benoit Apr 28 '11 at 8:35
    
yes, the second works, but slower than Michael's (0.030 ms over 0.010 ms on average) –  Yanick Rochon Apr 28 '11 at 8:41
    
@Yanick Rochon: No wonder, analytic functions are designed for that purpose. Self-join is therefore more costly (but it is still available if you switch to another RDBMS). –  Benoit Apr 28 '11 at 8:52
    
thank you for your help –  Yanick Rochon Apr 28 '11 at 8:57
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Probably this is the simplest way

SELECT id, other_id, date_value, value
FROM some_table
WHERE date_value in (SELECT MAX(date_value)
                     from some_table
                     GROUP BY other_id
                     HAVING other_id in (1,2,3));

Test the above query here

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