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This is the first time that I write a TestMethod. Am I using Unit Testing correctly ?

[TestMethod]
public void TestUpdateAccount()
{
    GwIntegrationServiceSoapClient client = new GwIntegrationServiceSoapClient();

    int id = 21; // Target account to update.
    Account accountToUpdate = client.ReadAccount(id);

    string oldName = accountToUpdate.Name;
    string oldEmail = accountToUpdate.Email;
    string newName = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
    string newEmail = Guid.NewGuid().ToString() + "@nomail.com";

    // Update the name only, even a value is passed in newEmail 
    // But in the propertiesToUpdate parameter (last one) only Name value is passed.
    // Note: the UpdateAccountProperty could be: 
    //          [UpdateAccountProperty.Name | UpdateAccountProperty.Name.Email]
    client.UpdateAccount(id, newName, newEmail, null, false, UpdateAccountProperty.Name);

    // Read the record after updating from database
    Account updatedAccountFirstTime = client.ReadAccount(21);

    // The name should be changed
    Assert.AreEqual(newName, updatedAccountFirstTime.Name);

    // The email should not be changed
    Assert.AreNotEqual(newEmail, updatedAccountFirstTime.Email);

    ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
    // Now, after updating the name and everything is working well
    // Returning the old name to the record.
    client.UpdateAccount(id, oldName, oldEmail, null, false, UpdateAccountProperty.Name);

    // Read the record after updating
    Account updatedAccountSecondTime = client.ReadAccount(21);

    Assert.AreEqual(oldName, updatedAccountSecondTime.Name);
}

Thank you very much for the answers. I've updated my test method to these two methods:

[TestMethod]
public void UpdateAccount_OneValueExpectedToBeUpdated_Updated()
{
    GwIntegrationServiceSoapClient client = new GwIntegrationServiceSoapClient();

    int id = 21; // Target account to update.
    Account accountToUpdate = client.ReadAccount(id);

    string oldName = accountToUpdate.Name;
    string oldEmail = accountToUpdate.Email;
    string newName = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();

    // Update the name only because it's passed by propertiesToUpdate parameter (last one).
    client.UpdateAccount(id, newName, null, null, false, UpdateAccountProperty.Name);

    // Read the record after updating from database
    Account updatedAccountFirstTime = client.ReadAccount(id);

    // The name should be changed
    Assert.AreEqual(newName, updatedAccountFirstTime.Name);
}

[TestMethod]
public void UpdateAccount_NoValueExpectedToBeUpdated_NotUpdated()
{
    GwIntegrationServiceSoapClient client = new GwIntegrationServiceSoapClient();

    int id = 21; // Target account to update.
    Account accountToUpdate = client.ReadAccount(id);

    string oldName = accountToUpdate.Name;
    string oldEmail = accountToUpdate.Email;
    string newName = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
    string newEmail = Guid.NewGuid().ToString() + "@nomail.com";

    // Update the name only, even a value is passed in newEmail 
    // But in the propertiesToUpdate parameter (last one) only Name value is passed.
    client.UpdateAccount(id, newName, newEmail, null, false, UpdateAccountProperty.Name);

    // Read the record after updating from database
    Account updatedAccountFirstTime = client.ReadAccount(id);

    // The email should not be changed
    Assert.AreNotEqual(newEmail, updatedAccountFirstTime.Email);
}
share|improve this question
4  
Your question should be asked on codereview.stackexchange.com –  CharlesB Apr 28 '11 at 8:42
    
@CharlesB: Didn't know that existed - thanks for the heads up. –  Jackson Pope Apr 28 '11 at 8:58
    
@CharlesB: Seems it does not exist in the stackexchange sites list. –  Homam Apr 28 '11 at 9:00
    
@Jack: Yeah I believe it's because it's in beta –  CharlesB Apr 28 '11 at 9:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is difficult to answer, because the kinds of tests you will find under the title of "Unit Testing" will vary. Mostly, "Unit Test" is used as a synonym for "Automated Code Test", which strictly speaking, is anything which tests code in some automatic fashion by writing code.

If you want to write good unit tests, there are only a few rules to follow:

  • Test scenarios independently.
  • Test objects independently.
  • Keep your tests small and focused. If they bloat, create methods to help reduce the boilerplate code and focus on the specifics of the test.

Ultimately, test one thing per test. That way when one particular behaviour or scenario breaks, you have an immediate focus as to which specific part of an object has failed. In your example, you seem to be testing a number of things in a single method, if the first call to UpdateAccount succeeds, but the second one fails, the whole test fails and you aren't clear as to which part of the object has failed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. I changed it and edited the question. I hope it's better now. –  Homam Apr 28 '11 at 9:09

You should get a copy of The art of unit testing.

Some points to be mentioned:

  • Only one Assert per test.
  • Naming conventions for test method: public void MethodUnderTest_Scenario_Behavior()
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. I changed it and edited the question. I hope it's better now. –  Homam Apr 28 '11 at 9:10
    
Why would you restrict yourself to one Assert per test? In my experience, even if you only test one thing, there may be multiple Asserts. –  Gorgsenegger Apr 28 '11 at 9:29
    
@Gorgsenegger: It is some kind of philosophical. If you have multiple asserts in one test and one asserts fail you don't know if the following asserts would fail too. So if you got one assert per test it is (maybe) simpler to find the root cause of a problem, than having multiple asserts in one test. –  Oliver Apr 28 '11 at 9:39
    
It probably depends on what you're testing too - if I test for an exception of a certain type and also for a certain message in the exception content I'm used to write multiple Asserts within one test method. Anyway, was just curious (and I'd also recommend reading The Art of Unit Testing to anyone who hasn't) ;-) –  Gorgsenegger Apr 28 '11 at 9:42

It seems good. I generally have less lines in my tests.

Could some of the boilerplate be moved into a fixture?

share|improve this answer

Some people (including Roy Osherove in his The Art of Unit Testing) recommend one assert per unit test, seeing as if the first assert fails an exception is thrown and none of the remaining code is called and no other asserts are checked.

This could be split into two or more unit tests to achieve this, e.g. one for checking the name after update, one for checking the email address and potentially one to check that changing and changing back works.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually I'm not satisfied with Changing the name and returning it to the orginal one. Any comment ? –  Homam Apr 28 '11 at 8:54
    
@Jack: It's probably unnecessary. –  Jackson Pope Apr 28 '11 at 8:56
    
Thank you very much. I changed it and edited the question. I hope it's better now. –  Homam Apr 28 '11 at 9:10

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