Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Possible Duplicate:
What is this weird colon-member syntax in the constructor?

Hi, I recently came across this syntax in a C++ program. This is not passing parameters to a base class constructor as I know what that looks like and how to code it. This looks like some sort of variable initialization for the class... Here is the code:

class Particle
{
private:
  bool movable;
  float mass;
  Vec3 pos;
  Vec3 old_pos; 
  Vec3 acceleration;
  Vec3 accumulated_normal;
public:
  Particle(Vec3 pos)
  : pos(pos),
    old_pos(pos),
    acceleration(Vec3(0,0,0)),
    mass(1),
    movable(true),
    accumulated_normal(Vec3(0,0,0))
  {}

  Particle() {}

  // More unrelated code
};
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Péter Török, Cody Gray, Gumbo Apr 28 '11 at 15:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
initialization lists – sehe Apr 28 '11 at 8:59
up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's the syntax for member initialization, as you surmised. Contrast this:

class C
{
private:
  int i;
public:
  C(int i_) : i(i_) {} // initialization
};

with:

class C
{
private:
  int i;
public:
  C(int i_) { i = i_; } // assignment
};

It's generally better to initialize members rather than assigning to them in the constructor body, and there are some cases where it's essential (one example would be references).

share|improve this answer

Initialisation lists can be used to initialise member variables as well as parents. This is the correct way of writing a constructor - initialisation like this is more efficient than doing assignment in the constructor body, and is likely semantically more correct.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 It should also be noted that member variables have to be initialised in the order they are declared. – helpermethod Apr 28 '11 at 9:01
2  
@Helper But not in the initialisation list, where order is not significant. – nbt Apr 28 '11 at 9:02
    
Ah, sry, ofc you are correct. Another reason why to use them :-). – helpermethod Apr 28 '11 at 9:04
5  
@Helper Method: Slightly unclear actually. They are initialized in the order they're declared, regardless of the order in which you write them in the initialization list. Thus you probably should write them in the order in which they're declared, for clarity. – Stuart Golodetz Apr 28 '11 at 9:04
2  
@Stuart Golodetz: +1. Most compiler actually issue a warning when you don't. – ereOn Apr 28 '11 at 9:07

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.