Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I typed the following example:

#include <iostream>
double f(double* x, double* y)
{
    std::cout << "val x: " << *x << "\n";
    std::cout << "val y: " << *y << "\n";
    return *x * *y;
}
double f2(double &x, double &y)
{
    std::cout << "val x: " << x << "\n";
    std::cout << "val y: " << y << "\n";
    return x * y;
}
int main()
{
    double a, b;
    a = 2;
    b = 3; 
    std::cout << f(&a, &b) << "\n";
    std::cout << f2(a, b) << "\n";
    return 0;
}   

In the function f I declare x and y as pointers of which I can get the value by using *x. When calling f I need to pass the address of my passed arguments, that is why I pass &a, &b. f2 is the same except the definition is different.

Now my question is: Are they both really the same concerning memory management? Both not making any copy of the passed value but instead passing a reference? I wonder about f2 because I couldn't read out the address of x in f2 so I know more about x and y in f (there I know address AND value).

Thanks in advance!

Edit: Okay thanks, after doing some more research, I found a quite useful topic:

Pointer vs. Reference There's also a link to google coding guidelines http://google-styleguide.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/cppguide.xml#Reference_Arguments which is quite useful I feel (as I understood now, it's a form of subject taste) to make more clear

share|improve this question
5  
This is not C, this is C++. – delnan Apr 28 '11 at 9:50
    
Ah I see so in C I always have to use pointers, okay thanks! Didn't know that so far! – tim Apr 28 '11 at 10:01
3  
>Google style guide - avoid it. It was outdated in 2008 (date of linked aswer), and it's even worse today. – MSalters Apr 28 '11 at 11:09
    
Okay thanks to inform! – tim Apr 28 '11 at 14:38
up vote 21 down vote accepted

f2 is taking it's arguments by reference, which is essentially an alias for the arguments you pass. The difference between pointer and reference is that a reference cannot be NULL. With the f you need to pass the address (using & operator) of the parameters you're passing to the pointer, where when you pass by reference you just pass the parameters and the alias is created.

Passing by const reference (const double& ref) is preferred when you are not going to change the arguments inside the function, and when you are going to change them, use non-const reference.

Pointers are mostly used when you need to be able to pass NULL to your parameters, obviously you'd need to check then inside your function if the pointer was not NULL before using it.

share|improve this answer
    
Why does someone need to pass Null to the parameters? – Elmo89 May 18 '14 at 11:25
    
Well they probably need to be able to pass null if needed. Obviously they're not going to pass it all the time. – Ludwik Jul 15 '14 at 6:25

This is just syntactic sugar to avoid having to use * everytime you reference the argument. You still can use & to have the address of x in f2.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for "syntactic sugar" :) – Stuart Golodetz Apr 28 '11 at 9:57
4  
Personally I think it's more than just that. It states that the argument CANNOT be null and is NOT optional. With pointers you can never tell and must always check. With references the function signature enforces the programmer's intent and leads to cleaner code which more accurately reflects that intent. – Len Holgate Apr 28 '11 at 10:00
    
You are right, I didn't mention the case of a NULL value. – philfr Apr 28 '11 at 10:02
    
Also, a pointer argument might expect an array. A reference argument specifically takes one single object, with no further documentation required. – Mike Seymour Apr 28 '11 at 12:13

Another difference that hasn't been mentioned is that you cannot change what a reference refers to. This doesn't make a lot of difference in the function call example shown in the original question.

int X(10), Y(20);
int *pX = X;
int& rY = Y;

*pX = 15; // change value of X
rY = 25;  // change value of Y

pX = Y;   // pX now points to Y

rY always points to Y and cannot be moved.

References can't be used to index into simple arrays like pointers.

share|improve this answer

You should have been able to read x address in both functions.

To do so in f2, you must of course prefix x by a & since there, x is a reference to a double, and you want an address.

A worth noticing difference between references and pointers is that the former cannot be NULL. You must pass something (valid) while when providing a pointer, you must specify in the documentation if passing NULL is allowed/well defined.

Another difference is a matter of readability: using references instead of pointers (when possible) makes the code less cluttered with * and ->.

share|improve this answer

In my head parameters of functions are always pass by value. Passing an int is easy to imagine, passing a double is just bigger and passing a struct or class could be very big indeed.
But passing a pointer to something, well, you're just passing an address by value. (A pointer is ofter a convenient size for the CPU just like an int.)
A reference is very similar, and certainly I think of a reference as a pointer, but with syntactic sugar to make it look like the object its referring to has been passed by value.

You can also think of a reference as a const pointer, ie:

int i;
int j;
int* p = &i;           // pointer to i
int* const cp = p;     // cp points to i, but cp cannot be modified
p = &j;                // OK - p is modified to point to j
*cp = 0;               // OK - i is overwritten
cp = &j;               // ERROR - cp cannot be modified

int& ri = i;           // ri refers to i
ri = 1;                // i is overwritten
ri = j;                // i is overwritten again
                       // Did you think ri might refer to j?

So, a pointer does double time: It is a value in its own right, but it can also point to another value when you dereference it, eg: *p.
Also, having reference parameters means that you cannot make them refer to anything else during the lifetime of the function because there's no way to express that.

A reference is supposed not to be able to be initialised with null, but consider this:

void foo(int& i);

int* p = 0;
foo(*p);

This means that pointers should be checked before you use them and references should not. Its just in the above example the pointer p should have been checked before being used in the call to foo:

if (p) foo(*p);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.