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I have created a smart pointer implementation as given below ::

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;
class Obj {
   int i, j;
public:
   Obj() { i = 0 ; j = 0 ; }
   Obj(int ii , int jj) : i(ii) , j(jj) { }
   void f() { cout << i << endl; }
   void g() { cout << j << endl; }
};

class ObjDerived : public Obj
{
    int k;
    public:
    ObjDerived(int kk = 0) :k(kk) { }
    void h() { cout << k << endl; }
};


template <typename ULT >
class SP
{
       ULT* ptr;

    public:
       explicit SP(ULT* tptr = NULL) : ptr(tptr) { }
       template <typename OTHER>
       SP(SP<OTHER>& other)
       {
           ptr = (ULT*)other.ptr;
       }    

       ULT* operator->() { return ptr; }
       ULT& operator*() { return *ptr; }
       SP<ULT>& operator=(SP<ULT>& tptr)
       {
           if(ptr != tptr.ptr)
               ptr = tptr.ptr;
           return *this;
       }
       SP<ULT>& operator=(ULT* tptr)
       {
           ptr = tptr;
           return *this;
       }

       template <typename OTHER>
       SP<ULT>& operator=(SP<OTHER>& der) // ??
       {
           cout << "In operator\n";
           this->ptr = (ULT*)der.ptr;
           return *this;
       }

       ~SP() 
       { 
           if(ptr != NULL )
               delete ptr; 
       }
};


int main() 
{
    SP<Obj> Sptr2(new Obj(10,20));

    SP<ObjDerived> Sptr4(new ObjDerived(80));
    Sptr2 = Sptr4; //error in this line
    return 0;


}

I am trying to cast a derived class pointer to base class pointer using smart pointer SP . The operator= member function

template <typename OTHER>
SP<ULT>& operator=(SP<OTHER>& der) // ??
{
     cout << "In operator\n";
     this->ptr = (ULT*)der.ptr;
     return *this;
}

is giving the following error ---> error: 'ObjDerived* SP::ptr' is private

I am not able to find out how to achieve the desired pointer conversion using smart pointer. I also searched previous posts on smart pointers but could not find exact answer to my problem.

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1  
Your copy and assignment behaviour is wrong - it will result in leaking the old object and deleting the new one twice. Also, the C-style casts will silently allow invalid pointer conversions, which could result in erroneously deleting an object through an incompatible pointer type. –  Mike Seymour Apr 28 '11 at 10:24
    
"I have created a smart pointer implementation". WHY? –  Johnsyweb Apr 28 '11 at 10:25
    
@Johnsyweb: As a learning exercise, it's a good thing to do. The most important lesson is that it's surprisingly hard to get right. –  Mike Seymour Apr 28 '11 at 10:29
    
@Mike: Completely agree. Unfortunately some people include these exercises in production code. –  Johnsyweb Apr 28 '11 at 10:33
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can provide public get() function member to be able to retrieve raw pointer. Commonly smart pointers provide this functionality. Small example:

template <typename ULT >
class SP {
// ...

ULT* get() const {return ptr;}

 template <typename OTHER>
 SP<ULT>& operator=(SP<OTHER>& der) {
     cout << "In operator\n";
     this->ptr = (ULT*)der.get();
     return *this;
 }

};

Also you can see Item 45 of Effective C++ for more information about creating smart pointer.

I assumed you are doing this for training tasks, because there are quite good smart pointers implementation, for example, boost::shared_ptr.

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Yes to some extent it is a self training task. I will try using boost::shared_ptr. –  Anand Apr 28 '11 at 12:07
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You can make member ptr as private. Or you can use in-built copy mechanism: Instead of,

this->ptr = (ULT*)der.ptr;  // ptr needs to be accessible

Do following:

*this = *((ULT*&)der);  // copy using in-built shallow copy
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Have you considered using Boost smart pointers instead of attempting to roll your own? They've already gone through all the pain of implementing good smart pointer classes. Even if for some reason you can't use Boost, you can still learn a lot from their classes.

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Well the member ptr is private - make it public or provide a public access method.

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