Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

At the interpreter,

a = [1,2,3,4]
a = a.reverse()

Next when I type a at the interpreter, I get nothing. So it seems a = a.reverse() generates an empty list. Is this by design?

I am using python 2.5 on windows xp.

share|improve this question
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

list.reverse() modifies the list in-place, returns None. But if you want to protect old list, you can use reversed() function for that, it returns an iterator.

In [1]: a=[1,2,3,4]

In [2]: print(a.reverse())
None

In [3]: a
Out[3]: [4, 3, 2, 1]

In [4]: a=[1,2,3,4]

In [5]: print(reversed(a))
<listreverseiterator object at 0x24e7e50>

In [6]: list(reversed(a))
Out[6]: [4, 3, 2, 1]

In [7]: a
Out[7]: [1, 2, 3, 4]
share|improve this answer
add comment

reverse changes list in-place, and doesn't return anything. Thus, this is the expected usage:

a = [1, 2, 3, 4]
a.reverse()
a       # => [4, 3, 2, 1]

If you assign the result of reverse back to a, you will overwrite all its hard work with the nonsensical return value (None), which is where your bug comes from.

share|improve this answer
add comment

list is a mutable type, so list operations are in-place, and return None.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The built-in method reverse of a list on python doesn't return the reversed list.

It reverses the list in place.

So, if you want to reverse your list, like in your code, just do:

a = [1,2,3,4]
a.reverse()
share|improve this answer
add comment

I think what you want to do is:

a = [1,2,3,4]
a.reverse()

a is an object and the operations work on it's data, so you don't need to assign again it.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The reverse method does the reverse 'in place' (like sort) and returns None, so after calling a.reverse() a already contains the result.

share|improve this answer
add comment

list.reverse() just doesn't return anything, because it changes the list in-place. See this example:

>>> a = [1,2,3,4]
>>> a.reverse()
>>> a
[4, 3, 2, 1]

There also is the reversed function (actually a type, but doesn't matter here), which does not change the list in-place, but instead returns an iterator with the list items in the reverse order. Try:

>>> a = [1,2,3,4]
>>> a = list(reversed(a))
>>> a
[4, 3, 2, 1]
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.