Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a js script that reads and parses XML. It obtains the XML from an XMLHttpRequest request (which contacts with a php script which returns XML). The script is supposed to receive 2 or more nodes under the first parentNode. The 2 nodes it requires have the name well defined, the other ones can be any name. The output from the php may be:

<?xml version='1.0'?>
<things>
    <carpet>
        <id>1</id>
        <name>1</name>
        <desc>1.5</desc>
    </carpet>
    <carpet>
        <id>2</id>
        <name>2</name>
        <height>unknown</height>
    </carpet>
</things>

Here all carpets have 7 nodes.

but it also may be:

<?xml version='1.0'?>
<things>
    <carpet>
        <id>1</id>
        <name>1</name>
        <desc>1.5</desc>
    </carpet>
    <carpet><id>2</id><name>2</name><height>unknown</height></carpet>
</things>

Here the first carpet has 7 nodes, the 2nd carpet has 3 nodes. I want my javascript code to treat both exactly the same way in a quick and clean way. If possible, I'd like to remove all the text nodes between each tag. So a code like the one above would always be treated as:

<?xml version='1.0'?>
    <things><carpet><id>1</id><name>1</name><desc>1.5</desc></carpet><carpet><id>2</id><name>2</name><height>unknown</height></carpet></things>

Is that possible in a quick and efficient way? I'd like not to use any get function (getElementsByTagName(), getElementById, ...), if possible and if more efficient.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's pretty straightforward to walk the DOM and remove the nodes you consider empty (containing only whitespace).

This is untested (tested and fixed, live copy here), but it would look something like this (replace those magic numbers with symbols, obviously):

var reBlank = /^\s*$/;
function walk(node) {
    var child, next;
    switch (node.nodeType) {
        case 3: // Text node
            if (reBlank.test(node.nodeValue)) {
                node.parentNode.removeChild(node);
            }
            break;
        case 1: // Element node
        case 9: // Document node
            child = node.firstChild;
            while (child) {
                next = child.nextSibling;
                walk(child);
                child = next;
            }
            break;
    }
}
walk(xmlDoc); // Where xmlDoc is your XML document instance

There my definition of "blank" is anything which only has whitespace according to the JavaScript interpreter's understanding of the \s (whitespace) RegExp class. Note that some implementations have issues with \s not being inclusive enough (several Unicode "blank" characters outside the ASCII range not being matched, etc.), so be sure to test with your sample data.

share|improve this answer
    
I will not use your suggestion but you gave me the idea I needed to go to a step forward which is enough to solve this, thanks. –  brunoais Apr 28 '11 at 10:45
    
@brunoais: Good deal, glad that helped. –  T.J. Crowder Apr 28 '11 at 10:49
    
@brunoais Care to share your own solution/what you ended up doing? Just for interest's sake. –  devios Sep 13 '11 at 13:38

I would just try a very crude string replace: assuming you store this in a variable called xml:

var rex = /(\<(\/)?[A-Za-z0-9]+\>)(\s)+/gi;
var a = xml.replace( rex, "$1" );

here's the complete test I put together:

<html><head></head>

<body>
<script type="text/javascript">
var xml = "<?xml version='1.0'?>\n" + 
"<things>\n" +
"    <carpet>\n" +
"        <id>1</id>\n" +
"        <name>1</name>\n" +
"        <desc>1.5</desc>\n" +
"    </carpet>\n" +
"    <carpet>\n" +
"        <id>2</id>\n" +
"        <name>2</name>\n" +
"        <height>unknown</height>\n" +
"    </carpet>\n" +
"</things>";

var rex = /(\<(\/)?[A-Za-z0-9]+\>)(\s)+/gi;
var a = xml.replace( rex, "$1" );
alert( a );

</script>


</body></html>
share|improve this answer
    
@Liv your solution is using regex which is a mid or slow way to solve. Also, you are assuming that I receive text from the server which is wrong I receive an XML Object. Sorry but your solution is no solution. –  brunoais Apr 28 '11 at 10:39
    
your XMLHttpRequest allows you to retrieve the response as a text via its property responseText. Also, the regex processing is not slow -- that is a misconception; you will find out in fact it is much faster than writing your own code to do search and replace within a string; even more so it is DEFINITELY faster than a DOM traversal! But I accept the fact that you don't want to use regex's and prefer DOM only methods. –  Liv Apr 28 '11 at 10:44
    
Using regular expressions to modify XML or HTML markup at the macro scale tends not to work very well. –  T.J. Crowder Apr 28 '11 at 10:50
    
@T.J. Crowder : Pray elaborate! –  Liv Apr 28 '11 at 10:50
1  
I hear you -- regex is not great for parsing XML IN GENERAL. Given the XML described in the above question though, when there are no attributes etc the regex will work. In other words I answered THIS question not a generic question about parsing XML using regex. (And yes, I agree with your point that regex is NOT the right way of parsing XML!) –  Liv Apr 28 '11 at 12:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.