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I have an application deployed on linux server with some ip say 11.22.33.44

Server Details

Java version - "1.6.0_14"

IP - 11.22.33.44

when i start the server i am getting the following o/p on server console '-Xrunjdwp:transport=dt_socket,server=y,suspend=y,address=8004'

This means i had set all the required information for starting the server in debug mode

Client side Setting (Other windows 7 machine)

For connection properties on eclipse the details are as follows Host : 11.22.33.44 (As above) Port : 8004 (As above)

I guess every thing is done correctly but still getting the

Failed to connect to remote VM. Connection refused.Connection timed out: connect

error

From my client machine where eclipse is running i am able to ping the server machine i.e. 11.22.33.44

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2 Answers 2

sounds like a firewall issue. Can you telnet from the command line on the given machine / port? Try this:

telnet 11.22.33.44 8004

if this fails then it means your port is not open -- either your JVM ignored the parameters and is not listening on that port or there is a firewall blocking your access. In order to identify which one it is, you can log onto the machine running tomcat and

telnet localhost 8004

if this succeeds it means your jvm is accepting remote debug connections on that port and therefore the problem is a firewall in your network, if it fails it means you haven't started the JVM with the correct remote debug params.

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when i am doing lsof -i on my linux machine then java 16295 cdc-ops 5u IPv4 13057055 TCP *:8004 (LISTEN) is showing up that means the server is running on debug port 8004 –  punamchand Apr 28 '11 at 10:58
    
Pardon? :O Have you missed something in your last comment? –  Liv Apr 28 '11 at 11:00
    
does the above statement means the server is accepting the connection at port 8004 –  punamchand Apr 28 '11 at 11:13
1  
I'm guessing you ran that command on your server (the one running tomcat which you are trying to connect to from your windows machine) right? The line "Connected to 11.22.33.44" means that you have actually connected to that port -- so your Tomcat IS listening on that port! (The fact that the connection was closed shortly after simply means you didn't follow the protocol expected and/or didn't send anything in a timely fashion so don't worry about that.) Altogether, what this means is that your server is configured correctly and ready for remote debugging. –  Liv Apr 28 '11 at 11:31
1  
no, ping works at ICMP level not at TCP level so ping just ensures you that there is a route to your machine. The only way to test connectivity on a port is telnet'ing into that port. On windows, you will need to go into control panel/Programs and features (or similar)/windows components and add the telnet client to be able to use it in the command line. –  Liv Apr 28 '11 at 14:47

After checking the following there is another source of error: Connection Type. So for others having the same issue, shall follow this problem resolution path:

  1. Ping the host that hosts your application (server). If not successful, check that you have one leg of your NIC in the same network as your target host - if working with IPs instead of hosts.
  2. telnet your host. e.g. telnet 192.168.0.2 8889 . If you can connect shortly, then that is fine. Seeing connection refused message is no success. "Connection closed by foreign host" is fine though.
  3. Now open Eclipse and create a Remote Debugging Configuration. Enter the same host and port that you previously telneted. Select Connection Type "Standard (Socket Attach)". Caution, if you see two of this same instance in the selection box, try both. Sometime one of these does NOT work.

This should do it. If not, drop a message and I help out.

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