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I have a page with alot of gifs.

<img src="gif/1303552574110.1.gif" alt="" >
<img src="gif/1302919192204.gif" alt="" >
<img src="gif/1303642234740.gif" alt="" >
<img src="gif/1303822879528.gif" alt="" >
<img src="gif/1303825584512.gif" alt="" >

What I'm looking for

1 On page load => Animations for all gifs are stopped

2 On mouseover => Animations starts for that one gif

3 On mouseout => Animation stops again for that gif

I suppose this can be done in Jquery but I don't know how.

Thanks.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 15 down vote accepted

No, you can't control the animation of the images.

You would need two versions of each iamge, one that is animated, and one that's not. On hover you can easily change from one image to another.

Example:

$(function(){
  $('img').each(function(e){
    var src = $(e).attr('src');
    $(e).hover(function(){
      $(this).attr('src', src.replace('.gif', '_anim.gif'));
    }, function(){
      $(this).attr('src', src);
    });
  });
});

Update:

Time goes by, and possibilities change. As kritzikatzi pointed out, having two versions of the image is not the only option, you can apparently use a canvas element to create a copy of the first frame of the animation. Note that this doesn't work in all browsers, IE 8 for example doesn't support the canvas element.

share|improve this answer
    
this answer has become only partially true. now you can uses the canvas tag to create a still image from the first frame of the gif (that's how the freezeframe plugin does it). obviously having two version can potentially save you a lot of bandwidth, just saying it's not the only option. –  kritzikratzi Jun 28 at 19:22
    
@kritzikratzi: You will have a lot of work if you want to downvote every old answer that isn't completely correct... I added a note about the new possibilities. –  Guffa Jun 28 at 21:44

I realise this answer is late, but I found a rather simple, elegant, and effective solution to this problem and felt it necessary to post it here.

However one thing I feel I need to make clear is that this doesn't start gif animation on mouseover, pause it on mouseout, and continue it when you mouseover it again. That, unfortunately, is impossible to do with gifs. (It is possible to do with a string of images displayed one after another to look like a gif, but taking apart every frame of your gifs and copying all those urls into a script would be time consuming)

What my solution does is make an image looks like it starts moving on mouseover. You make the first frame of your gif an image and put that image on the webpage then replace the image with the gif on mouseover and it looks like it starts moving. It resets on mouseout.

Just insert this script in the head section of your HTML:

$(document).ready(function()
{
    $("#imgAnimate").hover(
        function()
        {
            $(this).attr("src", "GIF URL HERE");
        },
        function()
        {
            $(this).attr("src", "STATIC IMAGE URL HERE");
        });
});

And put this code in the img tag of the image you want to animate.

id="imgAnimate"

This will load the gif on mouseover, so it will seem like your image starts moving. (This is better than loading the gif onload because then the transition from static image to gif is choppy because the gif will start on a random frame)

for more than one image just recreate the script:

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function()
{
    $("#imgAnimate1").hover(
        function()
        {
            $(this).attr("src", "gif/1303552574110.1.gif");
        },
        function()
        {
            $(this).attr("src", "STATIC IMAGE URL HERE");
        });
    $("#imgAnimate2").hover(
        function()
        {
            $(this).attr("src", "gif/1302919192204.gif");
        },
        function()
        {
            $(this).attr("src", "STATIC IMAGE URL HERE");
        });
    $("#imgAnimate3").hover(
        function()
        {
            $(this).attr("src", "gif/1303642234740.gif");
        },
        function()
        {
            $(this).attr("src", "STATIC IMAGE URL HERE");
        });
    $("#imgAnimate4").hover(
        function()
        {
            $(this).attr("src", "gif/1303822879528.gif");
        },
        function()
        {
            $(this).attr("src", "STATIC IMAGE URL HERE");
        });
    $("#imgAnimate5").hover(
        function()
        {
            $(this).attr("src", "gif/1303825584512.gif");
        },
        function()
        {
            $(this).attr("src", "STATIC IMAGE URL HERE");
        });
});
</script>

</head>
<body>

<img id="imgAnimate1" src="STATIC IMAGE URL HERE" alt="" >
<img id="imgAnimate2" src="STATIC IMAGE URL HERE" alt="" >
<img id="imgAnimate3" src="STATIC IMAGE URL HERE" alt="" >
<img id="imgAnimate4" src="STATIC IMAGE URL HERE" alt="" >
<img id="imgAnimate5" src="STATIC IMAGE URL HERE" alt="" >

</body>

That code block is a functioning web page (based on the information you have given me) that will display the static images and on hover, load and display the gif's. All you have to do is insert the url's for the static images.

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This works well for me. The other solutions didn't work for me. –  Paul Jan 18 '13 at 9:14
    
Thanks, I try =p I updated this answer with a lot of things I missed the first time around. (also fixed one error where I forgot to change the name of an ID from what it was in my version of the script) –  Mark Kramer Mar 25 '13 at 21:23
    
No, thank you! Here is where I implemented this technique: new.syntheticmedia.net Hover over the logo and the nav menu items. –  Paul Mar 29 '13 at 7:34
    
Very nice, I like it a lot =p –  Mark Kramer Mar 29 '13 at 7:42

You have no control over the animation frames of a GIF with JS.

Your question is a duplicate of: JavaScript to control image animation?

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The best option is probably to have a still image which you replace the gif with when you want to stop it.

<img src="gif/1303552574110.1.gif" alt="" class="anim" >
<img src="gif/1302919192204.gif" alt="" class="anim" >
<img src="gif/1303642234740.gif" alt="" class="anim" >
<img src="gif/1303822879528.gif" alt="" class="anim" >
<img src="gif/1303825584512.gif" alt="" class="anim" >

$(window).load(function() {
  $(".anim").src("stillimage.gif");
});

$(".anim").mouseover(function {
  $(this).src("animatedimage.gif");
});

$(".anim").mouseout(function {
  $(this).src("stillimage.gif");
});

You probably want to have two arrays containing paths to the still and animated gifs which you can assign to each image.

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I think the jQuery plugin freezeframe.js might come in handy for you. freezeframe.js is a jQuery Plugin To Automatically Pause GIFs And Restart Animating On Mouse Hover.

I guess you can easily adapt it to make it work on page load instead.

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working link: freezeframe.chrisantonellis.com –  tabacitu Jun 24 at 18:03

You can solve this by having a long stripe that you show in steps, like a filmstrip. Then you can stop the film on any frame. Example below (fiddle available at http://jsfiddle.net/HPXq4/9/):

the markup:

 <div class="thumbnail-wrapper">
     <img src="blah.jpg">
 </div>

the css:

.thumbnail-wrapper{
   width:190px;
   height:100px;
   overflow:hidden;
   position:absolute;
}
.thumbnail-wrapper img{
   position:relative;
   top:0;
}

the js:

var gifTimer;
var currentGifId=null;
var step = 100; //height of a thumbnail
$('.thumbnail-wrapper img').hover(
   function(){
      currentGifId = $(this)
      gifTimer = setInterval(playGif,500);
   },
   function(){
       clearInterval(gifTimer);
       currentGifId=null;
   }
);

var playGif = function(){
   var top = parseInt(currentGifId.css('top'))-step;
   var max = currentGifId.height();
   console.log(top,max)
   if(max+top<=0){
     console.log('reset')
     top=0;
   }
   currentGifId.css('top',top);
}

obviously, this can be optimized much further, but I simplified this example for readability

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A more elegant version of Mark Kramer's would be to do the following:

function animateImg(id, gifSrc){
  var $el = $(id),
    staticSrc = $el.attr('src');
  $el.hover(
    function(){
      $(this).attr("src", gifSrc);
    },
    function(){
      $(this).attr("src", staticSrc);
    });
}

$(document).ready(function(){
  animateImg('#id1', 'gif/gif1.gif');
  animateImg('#id2', 'gif/gif2.gif');
});

Or even better would be to use data attributes:

$(document).ready(function(){
  $('.animated-img').each(function(){
    var $el = $(this),
      staticSrc = $el.attr('src'),
      gifSrc = $el.data('gifSrc');
    $el.hover(
      function(){
        $(this).attr("src", gifSrc);
      },
      function(){
        $(this).attr("src", staticSrc);
      });
  });
});

And the img el would look something like:

<img class="animated-img" src=".../img.jpg" data-gif-src=".../gif.gif" />

Note: This code is untested but should work fine.

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Yup -- use two images, one animated and one still. Use your hover events to show/hide the appropriate gif.

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There is only one way from what I am aware.

Have 2 images, first a jpeg with first frame(or whatever you want) of the gif and the actual gif.

Load the page with the jpeg in place and on mouse over replace the jpeg with the gif. You can preload the gifs if you want or if they are of big size show a loading while the gif is loading and then replace the jpeg with it.

If you whant it to bi linear as in have the gif play on mouse over, stop it on mouse out and then resume play from the frame you stopped, then this cannot be done with javascript+gif combo.

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I found this, i think is a nice soluction! it's a jquery plugin that let you play any sprite sheet. http://spritespin.ginie.eu/

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1  
Note that link-only answers are discouraged, SO answers should be the end-point of a search for a solution (vs. yet another stopover of references, which tend to get stale over time). Please consider adding a stand-alone synopsis here, keeping the link as a reference. –  kleopatra Aug 15 '13 at 8:56

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