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I've recently moved over to a mac, and am struggling using the command line compilers. I'm using g++ to compile, and this builds a single source file fine. if I try to add a custom header file, when I try to compile using g++ I get undefined symbols for architecture i386. The programs compile fine in xCode however. Am I missing something obvious?

tried using g++ -m32 main.cpp... didn't know what else to try.


Okay, The old code compiled... Have narrowed it down to my constructors.

class Matrix{
public:
    int a;
    int deter;

    Matrix();
    int det();
};

#include "matrix.h"


Matrix::Matrix(){
    a = 0;
    deter = 0;
}

int Matrix::det(){
    return 0;

}

my error is Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64: "Matrix::Matrix()", referenced from: _main in ccBWK2wB.o ld: symbol(s) not found for architecture x86_64 collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

my main code has

#include "matrix.h"
int main(){
    Matrix m;

    return 0;
} 

along with the usual

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6  
Consider editing your question to include your code, header file, and command line invocations. –  Bavarious Apr 28 '11 at 12:05
    
and of course, the corresponding output ;) –  geekazoid Apr 28 '11 at 18:51
    
Just to be clear, which architecture are you trying to build for? Is it x86_64? –  Troubadour Apr 28 '11 at 23:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It looks like you’ve got three files:

  • matrix.h, a header file that declares the Matrix class;
  • matrix.cpp, a source file that implements Matrix methods;
  • main.cpp, a source file that defines main() and uses the Matrix class.

In order to produce an executable with all symbols, you need to compile both .cpp files and link them together.

An easy way to do this is to specify them both in your g++ or clang++ invocation. For instance:

clang++ matrix.cpp main.cpp -o programName

or, if you prefer to use g++ — which Apple haven’t updated in a while, and it looks like they won’t in the foreseeable future:

g++ matrix.cpp main.cpp -o programName
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect. My problem was I wasn't including both of my source files in my command line. I didn't realise I had to do that. Thanks! –  maccard Apr 29 '11 at 11:10
    
I've been looking all over for this solution. Thanks. –  Nate711 Aug 5 '13 at 4:57

is not the case here, but it may happen to be the you forget to put the class name with ::

for example:


a good format:

foo.h

class Foo{
public:
    Foo();
    void say();
private:
    int x;
};

foo.cpp

Foo::Foo(){
    this->x = 1;
}

void Foo::say(){
    printf("I said!\n");
}

a bad format

foo.h

class Foo{
public:
    Foo();
    void say();
private:
    int x;
}

foo.cpp

Foo::Foo(){
    this->x = 1;
}

//I always mistake here because I forget to put the class name with :: and the xcode don't show this error.
void say(){
    printf("I said!\n");
}
share|improve this answer
    
wow, this one did it for me.. I'd say not enough c++ experience from my side. I thought the issue was with Xcode. But no, it was my mistake. Will be careful now. –  2am Sep 22 '13 at 6:18
    
Perfect explain. Thanks. –  Can Ürek Aug 18 at 16:02

Did you actually define the Box constructor somewhere? (like Line.cpp)

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And you are missing a ; after the constructor declaration. –  RedX Apr 28 '11 at 13:52
    
Constructor is defined. The code compiles in XCode. and no, have a ; at the end of that line, that's just a type sorry. –  maccard Apr 28 '11 at 18:46
1  
and you're including Matrix.cpp in the command line too, right? –  Ken Aspeslagh Apr 29 '11 at 1:37
    
No, I wasn't including matrix.cpp in the command line. Thanks! –  maccard Apr 29 '11 at 11:11

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