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In my application I want to use coupon codes side by side with in-app purchases. So that users will be able to buy a product (audio content) from the app store, or to enter a coupon code and get the product for free. Coupon codes will be given outside of the application - user can get a coupon with purchasing of a flight ticket / insurence / hotel accomodation / etc.

From App Store review guidelines:

"Apps can read or play approved content (magazines, newspapers, books, audio, music, video) that is sold outside of the app, for which Apple will not receive any portion of the revenues, provided that the same content is also offered in the app using IAP at the same price or less than it is offered outside the app."

From one hand - the content is not being sold outside of the app, From the other hand users do not pay the same price or more than is offered inside the app for the product.

Is IAP together with coupon codes allowed in IOS apps?

Thanks!

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The app store wording for this is not the same as above anymore. developer.apple.com/appstore/resources/approval/guidelines.html. "Apps can read or play approved content (specifically magazines, newspapers, books, audio, music, video and cloud storage) that is subscribed to or purchased outside of the app, as long as there is no button or external link in the App to purchase the approved content. Apple will only receive a portion of revenues for content purchased inside the App." –  bandejapaisa May 2 '13 at 9:22

3 Answers 3

Is IAP together with coupon codes allowed in IOS apps?

In my direct experience, the answer is no. Apple do not permit coupon codes in association with IAP, even if it is clear that the coupons are not being paid for elsewhere. I've had apps rejected for this precise scenario, even when it seems bonkers. They would presumably argue that whilst it might be clear you aren't selling the coupon codes via another channel now, if they allowed the app, there would be nothing to stop you doing this in future - and that would harm their revenue.

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From the statement:

"Apps can read or play approved content (magazines, newspapers, books, audio, music, video) that is sold outside of the app, for which Apple will not receive any portion of the revenues, provided that the same content is also offered in the app using IAP at the same price or less than it is offered outside the app."

If you coupon code is obtained for FREE, you could only have the IAP available for free.

At least, that's how I read it.

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The app store wording for this is not the same as above anymore. developer.apple.com/appstore/resources/approval/guidelines.html. "Apps can read or play approved content (specifically magazines, newspapers, books, audio, music, video and cloud storage) that is subscribed to or purchased outside of the app, as long as there is no button or external link in the App to purchase the approved content. Apple will only receive a portion of revenues for content purchased inside the App." –  bandejapaisa May 2 '13 at 9:22

There is no free level for iOS IAP items, and therefore the answer from @twilson isn't correct.

Apple says to have your coupon experience exist on a webpage, and associate it with a user account, and then complete the purchase inside the app.

They offered us no example of how that would all work. It feels as if they are afraid that money will bleed out of the IAP system, were they to allow coupons or redemption codes inside the app. However, given that all the purchases would be completed inside the IAP system, this argument seems specious and weak.

If I have a $10 IAP product and I expect to receive $7 from the sale of it, for what price would I sell a $3-off coupon and have it make sense for both me and my users? I'm much better off using the coupon in a traditional means, as something free given in hopes of obtaining a new purchase. Low overhead, easier accounting, and it's just common sense.

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