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I have a file which first 64 bytes are:

0x00:  01 00 00 10 00 00 00 20 00 00 FF 03 00 00 00 10  
0x10:  00 00 00 10 00 00 FF 03 00 00 00 10 00 00 FF 03  
0x20:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  
0x30:  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 

When i'm reading the file (mode read and write) at position 26 for 4 bytes I get 0 and the next time (at position 30) i get correctly 4096.

The code is:

// read LastDirectoryBlockStartByte...
seekg(26);
char * pCUIBuffer = new char[4];
read(pCUIBuffer, 4);
const unsigned int x1 = gcount ();
const unsigned int LastDirectoryBlockStartByte = *(unsigned int *)pCUIBuffer;

// read LastDirectoryBlockNumberItems...
seekg(30);
read(pCUIBuffer, 4);
const unsigned int x2 = gcount ();
const unsigned int LastDirectoryBlockNumberItems = *(unsigned int *)pCUIBuffer;

With gcount() I checked the bytes are read - and this were correctly both times 4. I have no idea to debug it.

---------- EDIT ----------

When I use the following code (with some dummy before) it reads correctly:

char * pCUIBuffer = new char[4];
seekg(26);
read(pCUIBuffer, 4);
const unsigned int x1 = gcount ();
seekg(26);
read(pCUIBuffer, 4);
const unsigned int x2 = gcount ();
const unsigned int LastDirectoryBlockStartByte = *(unsigned int *)pCUIBuffer;

// read LastDirectoryBlockNumberItems...
seekg(30);
read(pCUIBuffer, 4);
const unsigned int x3 = gcount ();
const unsigned int LastDirectoryBlockNumberItems = *(unsigned int *)pCUIBuffer;

The difficulty is that the code stands at the begining in a methode. And the "false readed value" has obviously nothing to do with the listed code. Maybe theres a trick with flush or sync (but both I tryed...) or somewhat else...

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Are you on a big-endian or little-endian architecture? –  JSBձոգչ Apr 28 '11 at 12:44
    
Show your open statement. Are you opening with binary mode? –  gregg Apr 28 '11 at 12:46
    
@gregg: I'm in binary mode... –  oRUMOo Apr 28 '11 at 12:51
1  
Why don't you declare CUIBuffer to just be an unsigned long, pass a pointer when reading, and get rid of a lot of noise in the code? –  unwind Apr 28 '11 at 13:00
1  
Try enabling exceptions by calling exceptions (eofbit | failbit | badbit) ; (or just checking these bits after each call). –  TonyK Apr 28 '11 at 14:15

2 Answers 2

You are saying that pCUIBuffer contains a pointer:

*(unsigned int *)pCUIBuffer;

And then you go get whatever it's pointing at...in RAM. That could be anything.

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@ Steve Wellens: between new statement and "...*(unsigned int *)pCUIBuffer;" I read the filecontent to pCUIBuffer. –  oRUMOo Apr 28 '11 at 12:58
    
What? pCUIBuffer is a char*, and what the OP has is the correct way to get an integral value from a char* buffer. –  JSBձոգչ Apr 28 '11 at 13:00
    
@Steve: The OP's statement is correct. pCIUBuffer is a pointer, and this is the correct way to access what it points to, interpreted as an unsigned int. –  TonyK Apr 28 '11 at 14:11
    
@TonyK- Say he reads the number 1234 from the file and then says it's a pointer. So he goes to memory address 1234 and gets whatever memory happens to be there and casts it to an unsigned it. That's what it looks like to me. Who knows what could be at memory location 1234. –  Steve Wellens Apr 28 '11 at 21:13
    
@Steve: Still wrong. If you don't believe me, just go to ideone.com/muDNL and look at the output. –  TonyK Apr 29 '11 at 9:20
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Now I'm writing an answer, because my attempt to contact TonyK failes (I asked for writing an answer).

The perfect answer to my question was to enable exceptions by calling exceptions (eofbit | failbit | badbit).

Rumo

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