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I've seen variation on this question before, but without a definite answer.

I have a list of object with a timestamp (stock trades data, or 'ticks'):

Class Tick
{
  Datetime Timestamp;
  double Price;
}
  1. I want to generate another list based on those values which is grouped by certain interval in order to create an OHLC bar (Open, High, Low, Close). These bars may be of any interval specified (1 minute, 5, 10 or even 1 hour).

  2. I also need to find an efficient way to sort new "ticks" into the list, as they may arrive at high rate (3-5 ticks per second).

Would appreciate any thoughts on this, Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Could you give an example of input and expected output? – Thomas Levesque Apr 28 '11 at 14:53
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I want to generate another list based on those values which is grouped by certain interval in order to create an OHLC bar (Open, High, Low, Close). These bars may be of any interval specified (1 minute, 5, 10 or even 1 hour).

Unfortunately, you haven't specified:

  1. What the phase of the bar-series will be.
  2. Whether a bar's begin / end times are purely "natural-time" based (depend solely on a fixed schedule rather than on the timestamp of the first and last ticks in it) or not.

Assuming natural-time intra-day bars, the phases are usually clamped to midnight. So hourly bars will be 00:00 - 01:00, 01:00 - 02:00, etc. In this case, the begin / end-time of a bar can serve as its unique-key.

So then the problem becomes: To what bar- begin / end time does a tick's timestamp belong to? If we assume everything I've assumed above, that can be solved easily with some simple integer math. The query can then be something like (untested, algo only):

var bars = from tick in ticks

           // Calculate the chronological, natural-time, intra-day index 
           // of the bar associated with a tick.
           let barIndexForDay = tick.Timestamp.TimeOfDay.Ticks / barSizeInTicks

           // Calculate the begin-time of the bar associated with a tick.
           // For example, turn 2011/04/28 14:23.45 
           // into 2011/04/28 14:20.00, assuming 5 min bars.
           let barBeginDateTime = tick.Timestamp.Date.AddTicks
                              (barIndexForDay * barSizeInTicks)

           // Produce raw tick-data for each bar by grouping.
           group tick by barBeginDateTime into tickGroup

           // Order prices for a group chronologically.
           let orderedPrices = tickGroup.OrderBy(t => t.Timestamp)
                                        .Select(t => t.Price)

           select new Bar
           {
                Open = orderedPrices.First(),
                Close = orderedPrices.Last(),
                High = orderedPrices.Max(),
                Low = orderedPrices.Min(),
                BeginTime = tickGroup.Key,
                EndTime = tickGroup.Key.AddTicks(barSizeInTicks)
           };

It's common to want to locate a bar by index / date-time as well as to enumerate all bars in a series chronologically. In this case, you might want to consider storing the bars in a collection such as a SortedList<DateTime, Bar> (where the key is a bar's begin or end time), which will fill all these roles nicely.

I also need to find an efficient way to sort new "ticks" into the list, as they may arrive at high rate (3-5 ticks per second).

It depends on what you mean.

If these ticks are coming off a live price-feed (chronologically), you don't need a look-up at all - just store the current, incomplete, "partial" bar. When a new tick arrives, inspect its timestamp. If it is still part of the current "partial" bar, just update the bar with the new information (i.e. Close = tick.Price, High = Max(oldHigh, tick.Price) etc.). Otherwise, the "partial" bar is done - push it into your bar-collection. Do note that if you are using "natural-time" bars, the end of a bar could also be brought on by the passage of time rather than by a price-event (e.g. an hourly bar completes on the hour).

EDIT:

Otherwise, you'll need to do a lookup. If you're storing in the bars in a sorted-list (keyed by begin-time / end-time) as I've mentioned above, then you'll just need to calculate the bar begin-time / end-time associated with a tick. That should be easy enough; I've already given you a sample of how you might accomplish that in the LINQ query above.

For example:

myBars[GetBeginTime(tick.Timestamp)].Update(tick);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I am not sure the ticks might chronologically, how would you approach this issue without recalculating the whole list again? – Saul Apr 28 '11 at 15:34
    
Also, I think that this won't work on a chart with multiple days – Saul Apr 28 '11 at 15:37
    
@Saul: It will work for multiple days - the key for the group takes tick.Timestamp.Date into consideration. – Ani Apr 28 '11 at 15:39
    
@Saul: Does my edit address your first follow-up? – Ani Apr 28 '11 at 16:09
    
Yes, that's perfect, thanks! – Saul Apr 28 '11 at 16:46

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