Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a web based order system for items.

  • Items are very time limited, on sale for Y hours
  • Each item allow only X orders

To keep the orders per item <= X I'm using this locking mechanism.

private static Dictionary<Guid, Object> PurchaseLockDictionary = null;

private static object GetLock(Guid itemId)
    {
        if (!PurchaseLockDictionary.ContainsKey(itemId))
        {
            PurchaseLockDictionary.Add(itemId, new object());
        }
        return PurchaseLockDictionary[itemId];
    }

And the purchase looks like this:

public static Order Purchase(Buyer buyer, OrderItem item)
    {
        Order order;
        try
        {
            lock (GetLock(item.Id))
            {
                // order stuff like counting current amount of orders, buyer validity etc
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            // Exception stuff
        }
        return order;
    }

Now, my question is, how do I keep my locking mechanism (the Dictionary object) from growing out of proportions? Currently we perform a weekly reboot of the server for other reasons, but I do not want the code to rely on such behavior.

Is there another data structure that is more suitable for this locking mechanism? Or is there a smart way of find and clean old entries in the Dictionary? Ideas are very welcome!

share|improve this question
1  
If this code is being called from multiple threads (and if it's not then there's no need for any locks at all) then you need some sort of big, global lock around the dictionary itself. If not then you run the risk of race conditions, or even corrupting your dictionary, when multiple threads hit ContainsKey, Add, the indexer etc. –  LukeH Apr 28 '11 at 14:53
    
It sounds like you want to use a cache solution which will expire items that are not used/accessed frequently. If so then you should take a look at System.Runtime.Caching msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.runtime.caching.aspx –  Chris Taylor Apr 28 '11 at 14:53
    
do you reuse the objects you add in the dictionary for counting the number of ordered items or do you use it simply as Lock? –  fix_likes_coding Apr 28 '11 at 14:54
    
@LukeH : Multithreaded yes, web based. @fantasticfix: Just for locking, counting is performed inside the lock. –  mofoo Apr 29 '11 at 8:59
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
using (var locker = new PurchaseLocker(item.Id))
{
    // order stuff like counting current amount of orders, buyer validity etc
}

// ...

public sealed class PurchaseLocker : IDisposable
{
    private static readonly object _bigLock = new object();
    private static readonly Dictionary<Guid, LockToken> _lockMap = new Dictionary<Guid, LockToken>();
    private readonly Guid _itemId;

    public PurchaseLocker(Guid itemId)
    {
        _itemId = itemId;

        LockToken miniLock;
        lock (_bigLock)
        {
            if (!_lockMap.TryGetValue(itemId, out miniLock))
            {
                miniLock = new LockToken();
                _lockMap.Add(itemId, miniLock);
            }
            miniLock.Count++;
        }
        Monitor.Enter(miniLock);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        lock (_bigLock)
        {
            LockToken miniLock = _lockMap[_itemId];
            miniLock.Count--;
            if (miniLock.Count == 0)
                _lockMap.Remove(_itemId);

            Monitor.Exit(miniLock);
        }
    }

    private sealed class LockToken
    {
        public int Count;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like a perfect solution actually. Really beautiful with using! Why did not I think of that! Does not affect current code. Could actually do a copy paste directly into my code and start testing! –  mofoo Apr 29 '11 at 8:44
add comment

It sounds like you want to use a cache solution which will expire items that are not used/accessed frequently. If so then you should take a look at System.Runtime.Caching. You can add items to the cache and set their expiry policy etc.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you're using that in a multi-threaded program, you're going to have trouble. Dictionary is not thread-safe. Consider using ConcurrentDictionary instead.

For your items, I assume you're incrementing an order count every time somebody orders one. Can't you just have the Purchase method remove the item from the dictionary when that item's order count gets to the maximum, or when the item goes off special?

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for that pointer to ConcurrentDictionary! Yes, I could remove the entries when purchase reach X, but in a worst case scenario, each item is bought X-1 times, and no entries are removed. –  mofoo Apr 28 '11 at 16:00
    
@mofoo: But you said that items are time limited. So you should be able to remove an item from the dictionary once the item's time has expired (i.e. the item is no longer on sale). –  Jim Mischel Apr 28 '11 at 16:11
    
True, I could have such a solution.. But then I need to check for expired items, when do I perform that check? It would work, but it would create more overhead in the order transaction and not that pretty code. –  mofoo Apr 29 '11 at 8:57
    
@mofoo: I figured you already had some way to prevent things from being ordered when they were no longer available, and so could call the removal method then. –  Jim Mischel Apr 29 '11 at 13:26
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.