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Hi i've looked at all the other questions similar to this that I could find and haven't been able to fix my last problem, though the answers to other questions got me this far.

I'm trying to write an array to a file, and so far I can do that, but the writer just writes everything on the same line. For some reason it won't accept my new line command (\n) when viewed in notepad.

An example to try and explain:

Array contents: test, test2, test3, test4

Write to file

File contents: test test2 test3 test4

Whereas i want the file to be: test test2 test3 test4

Below is the segment of my code to write to the file.

    public void save(String fileName) throws FileNotFoundException {

    try {

        BufferedWriter writer = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(fileName));
        for ( int i = 0; i < nbrMovies; i++)
        {      
        writer.write(movies[i].getName() + " \n");
        }
        writer.close();
    } catch(IOException ex) {
        ex.printStackTrace();
    }
}

The file doesn't accept the "\n" command and instead just puts a little box next to the last movie added.

Any and all help would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
All text files should be able to accept "\n" character. What text editor you use to open the text file you just wrote? The text editor may not support reading unix style text file and show \n as a little box. Try using "\r\n" if you want to have Windows style text file. The line endings are different on these two OS. –  gigadot Apr 28 '11 at 15:16
    
Better yet, use writer.newLine() and it will insert the appropriate line ending for the platform. –  Jacob Mattison Apr 28 '11 at 15:47

8 Answers 8

First of all, you shouldn't close() the stream after every write; move the close() outside your loop, preferably into a finally block to ensure it is called. Second, rather than writing "\n", a better approach is

writer.write(movies[i].getName());
writer.newLine();
writer.flush(); //optional
share|improve this answer

Take writer.close(); out of the for loop. Your code should be like this:-

 public void save(String fileName) throws FileNotFoundException {
    BufferedWriter writer = null;
    try {

        writer = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(fileName));
        for ( int i = 0; i < nbrMovies; i++)
        {      
          writer.write(movies[i].getName());
          writer.newLine();
      writer.flush();
        }

    } catch(IOException ex) {
        ex.printStackTrace();
    } finally{
        if(writer!=null){
            writer.close();
        }  
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This snippet won't compile because writer is not visible inside the finally block. –  Binil Thomas Apr 28 '11 at 15:46
    
@Binil Thomas - Ofcourse - the purpose is not give production ready compile but to show where the problem is and how to do it better. Moving writer to outside the try catch is a very trivial task. –  CoolBeans Apr 28 '11 at 15:53
    
@CoolBeans - if its trivial why didn't you do it? I would of thought the purpose is to give a correct answer. –  user3799584 Aug 4 '14 at 20:00

There is this writer.newLine(); and move the call to close out of the loop.

share|improve this answer
import java.io.*;

public class WriteChar 
{

    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {

        try
    {
       File f=new File("WriteChar.txt");
      char c[]={'a','b','c','d','e','f','g'};


       FileWriter out=new FileWriter(f);
       out.write(c);
       System.out.println("Done ..........");
       out.close();
    }

        catch(IOException ioe)
        {
            ioe.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer

Wrap the FileWriter or BufferedWriter with a PrintWriter, and you will have access to the println(...) method.

share|improve this answer

Move the writer.close() outside the loop. Also, make sure that you flush the writer before closing it.

share|improve this answer
    
close() has an implicit flush() –  Qwerky Apr 28 '11 at 14:57

Why don't you call close outside the loop?

Writer writer = null;
try {
    writer = new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter(fileName));
    for (Movie movie : movies) {      
        writer.write(movie.getName() + " \n");
    }
} catch(IOException ex) {
    ex.printStackTrace();
} finally {
    if (writer != null) {
        try {
            writer.close();
        } catch (IOException ignored) {
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I agree with moving the writer.close() outside the loop. But there is a simpler way of doing what you want - rather than calling the newline function, just append carriage return instead of return at the end of the statement i.e.

change the statement: writer.write(movies[i].getName() + " \n"); to: writer.write(movies[i].getName() + " \r\n");

share|improve this answer
2  
This will work because notepad requires both the \r and the \n to recognize a newline. So this isn't a problem with writing the file - rather it's a problem opening a linux-style file in notepad. –  Erick Robertson Sep 27 '12 at 14:04

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