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I'm not sure what the proper name for this is, it's so hard to google:

In C, C++, etc. you can tell the compiler that a literal number is not what it appears to be (, that is, X, float instead of double, unsigned long instead of int:

var d = 1.0;  // double
var f = 1.0f; // float
var u = 1UL;  // unsigned long

etc.

Is there a list of these? I'm specifically looking for a suffix for short or Int16.

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possible duplicate of Defining different types of numbers in C# –  Daniel Renshaw Apr 28 '11 at 15:08
    
Talk about a flurry of responses... Upvotes for everyone. –  David Lively Apr 28 '11 at 15:31
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5 Answers

up vote 65 down vote accepted
var d = 1.0d; // double
var f = 1.0f; // float
var m = 1.0m; // decimal
var i = 1; // int
var ui = 1U; // uint
var ul = 1UL; // ulong
var l = 1L; // long

I think that's all... there are no literal specifiers for short/ushort/byte/sbyte

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Most succinct complete response, accepted. –  David Lively Apr 28 '11 at 15:33
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Does this mean you have to cast everywhere you use short/ushort/byte/sbyte? Eg.: somebyte = somebool ? (byte) 1 : (byte) 0; –  mola Feb 7 '13 at 13:19
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@mola, yes, unless the desired type is unambiguous (e.g. byte b = 42;) –  Thomas Levesque Feb 7 '13 at 16:01
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From §2.4.4.2 Integer literals:

The type of an integer literal is determined as follows:

  • If the literal has no suffix, it has the first of these types in which its value can be represented: int, uint, long, ulong.
  • If the literal is suffixed by U or u, it has the first of these types in which its value can be represented: uint, ulong.
  • If the literal is suffixed by L or l, it has the first of these types in which its value can be represented: long, ulong.
  • If the literal is suffixed by UL, Ul, uL, ul, LU, Lu, lU, or lu, it is of type ulong.

And from §2.4.4.3 Real literals:

If no real type suffix is specified, the type of the real literal is double. Otherwise, the real type suffix determines the type of the real literal, as follows:

  • A real literal suffixed by F or f is of type float. For example, the literals 1f, 1.5f, 1e10f, and 123.456F are all of type float.
  • A real literal suffixed by D or d is of type double. For example, the literals 1d, 1.5d, 1e10d, and 123.456D are all of type double.
  • A real literal suffixed by M or m is of type decimal. For example, the literals 1m, 1.5m, 1e10m, and 123.456M are all of type decimal. This literal is converted to a decimal value by taking the exact value, and, if necessary, rounding to the nearest representable value using banker's rounding (Section 4.1.7). Any scale apparent in the literal is preserved unless the value is rounded or the value is zero (in which latter case the sign and scale will be 0). Hence, the literal 2.900m will be parsed to form the decimal with sign 0, coefficient 2900, and scale 3.
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Second result when Googling "c# literal suffixes": http://www.dotnetperls.com/suffix.

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Here's a chart with VB and C# suffixes: undermyhat.org/blog/2009/08/… –  Forgotten Semicolon Apr 28 '11 at 15:07
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If your variable isn't already a short, you have to cast it explicitly :

Object s = (Int16) 1;
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Side note: I think this causes a boxing conversion. –  David Lively Jan 7 at 16:45
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There isn't one for short. Just use short s = 1;.

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