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Can anybody help me understand the anatomy of a Windows Form (.net)?

When I create a new Windows Form from my .NET application, I can see in the designer class some basic amount of code generated by the studio. I have just copy pasted it below.

namespace FormBasic
{
    partial class Form1
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Required designer variable.
        /// </summary>
        private System.ComponentModel.IContainer components = null;

        /// <summary>
        /// Clean up any resources being used.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="disposing">true if managed resources should be disposed; otherwise, false.</param>
        protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (disposing && (components != null))
            {
                components.Dispose();
            }
            base.Dispose(disposing);
        }

        #region Windows Form Designer generated code

        /// <summary>
        /// Required method for Designer support - do not modify
        /// the contents of this method with the code editor.
        /// </summary>
        private void InitializeComponent()
        {
            this.SuspendLayout();
            // 
            // Form1
            // 
            this.AutoScaleDimensions = new System.Drawing.SizeF(6F, 13F);
            this.AutoScaleMode = System.Windows.Forms.AutoScaleMode.Font;
            this.ClientSize = new System.Drawing.Size(292, 266);
            this.Name = "Form1";
            this.Text = "Form1";
            this.ResumeLayout(false);

        }
        #endregion
    }
}

Of them what I found interesting was this line of code

private System.ComponentModel.IContainer components = null;

What exactly is this Container? I debugged by placing a break point in the InitializeComponent function. The components remain null.

Also the hierarchy of the Form class is Form class Inherits from ContainerControl class. Can you please help me to clear these terminologies?

share|improve this question
    
Drop a control onto the page, run debug again and see what happens :) –  DaveRead Apr 28 '11 at 15:24
    
I did that. Minor tweaks happen in the designer code to accommodate the newly added control. But still the components remain null. –  Nishant Apr 28 '11 at 15:26
    
Are you asking because you want to be able to do something in particular, or are you just curious about how the designer code works? –  siride Apr 28 '11 at 15:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The components field is a container for non-visual components (like OpenFileDialog, ErrorProvider, FileSystemWatcher...). It's only initialized if you have such components on your form. It's a way to ensure that these components are disposed when the form is disposed.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok. that was the catch. NON-VISUAL!!!! Thanks. But is there anything more you can add or provide a link for me to understand more about windows forms. –  Nishant Apr 29 '11 at 8:08
    
@Nishant, this page looks like a good starting point –  Thomas Levesque Apr 29 '11 at 8:13

The line private System.ComponentModel.IContainer components = null; facilitates the management of items like Timer or BackgroundWorker in the "Components" section of the toolbox. In the editor, they show up like this:

enter image description here

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