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SELECT E.id_employee,E.name,E.age,E.wage,D.name,
    CASE (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM manages M 
        WHERE M.id_employee=E.id_employee) 
        WHEN 1 THEN 'Chief' 
        WHEN 0 THEN '-'
    END CASE
FROM Employee E 
INNER JOIN work_in 
INNER JOIN Department D

it gives that error:

Could not connect: You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'CASE FROM Employee E INNER JOIN work_in INNER JOIN Department D' at line 5

What am I missing here? Please immediate help.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is no 'CASE' after 'END'

SELECT E.id_employee,E.name,E.age,E.wage,D.name,
                CASE (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM manages M WHERE M.id_employee=E.id_employee) 
                    WHEN 1 THEN 'Chief' 
                    WHEN 0 THEN '-'
                END
FROM Employee E INNER JOIN work_in INNER JOIN Department D
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1  
dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/case-statement.html disagrees. –  Nik Apr 28 '11 at 15:49
    
it is END CASE –  Framework Apr 28 '11 at 15:52
2  
Well, not in a query... dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/control-flow-functions.html. It is two different CASE statement, and the OP need the one without the END CASE. –  Cyril Gandon Apr 28 '11 at 15:52
    
@Nik - dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/… disagrees with you... check the note at the end of the first bullet point. –  eykanal Apr 28 '11 at 15:54
1  
@eykanal, that's the syntax to use inside a stored procedure, the syntax inside a SELECT statement ends with just END –  Johan Apr 28 '11 at 15:56

Remove the last CASE keyword, after the END

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Remove the word CASE from after END.

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You're mixing up the syntax of the CASE Statement and the CASE expression. While the first one is used in stored procedures, the second one is the one used in SQL statements.

CASE expression

SELECT CASE 1 WHEN 1 THEN 'one' WHEN 2 THEN 'two' ELSE 'more' END;

CASE statement

CASE case_value
    WHEN when_value THEN statement_list
    [WHEN when_value THEN statement_list] ...
    [ELSE statement_list]
END CASE

Or as the manual puts it

Note

The syntax of the CASE statement used inside stored programs differs slightly from that of the SQL CASE expression described in Section 11.4, “Control Flow Functions”. The CASE statement cannot have an ELSE NULL clause, and it is terminated with END CASE instead of END.

So in your case there is no CASE after the END.

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You are missing ON condition for the inner join or USING() clause.

SELECT E.id_employee,E.name,E.age,E.wage,D.name,
                CASE (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM manages M WHERE M.id_employee=E.id_employee) 
                    WHEN 1 THEN 'Chief' 
                    WHEN 0 THEN '-'
                END
            FROM Employee E 
               INNER JOIN work_in w
                  ON e.id_employee=w.id.employee
               INNER JOIN Department D
                  ON w.id_department=D.id_department
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You'll note the join condition on an INNER JOIN is optional: join_table: table_reference [INNER | CROSS] JOIN table_factor [join_condition] | ... –  Orbling Apr 28 '11 at 15:56
    
@Orbling--sure, it's optional, but you think query will pass the syntax check without it? It's really only optional for 2 reasons: because of the CROSS JOIN, and because you can use USING() or WHERE clause for the join conditions. He's got an inner join and no WHERE specified. –  dawebber Apr 28 '11 at 16:01
    
@dawebber, tested it, following query does work: select * from table1 inner join table2; Strangely enough it does a full outer join this way :-) –  Johan Apr 28 '11 at 19:56
    
@Johan, frankly I'm surprised, but reality is reality. Obviosuly full outer join is not the expected outcome of the inner join. This is OT, but I wonder what the mySQL folks have to say about that? What sort of design forethought was in place there? –  dawebber Apr 28 '11 at 20:13
    
@sawebber, Errors are evil, LOL expect the unexpected? –  Johan Apr 28 '11 at 20:15

Change it to:

"SELECT E.id_employee,E.name,E.age,E.wage,D.name,
  CASE (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM manages M WHERE M.id_employee=E.id_employee)
    WHEN 1 THEN 'Chief'                     
    WHEN 0 THEN '-'                 
  END              
FROM Employee E 
INNER JOIN work_in w ON (w.id = e.work_id)
INNER JOIN Department D ON (D.id = e.department_id)"

Warning
If you do an inner join with no condition(s), it will actually transform into a full outer join!
This means if you run the following query:

SELECT * FROM a
INNER JOIN b
INNER JOIN c

where table a, b and c each have 100 rows, you will get a grand total of 1,000,000 rows in your resultset, listing every possible combination of a, b and c.
In 99,999% of the cases this is definitely not what you'd want.

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