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Which method is preferred strstr or strpos ?

Hi!

Could you tell me which one is faster:
strstr($mystring, $findme);
OR
strpos($mystring, $findme);
OR
anything else

in finding the - first or any - occurrence of a string in another one?

Does it even matter in performance if I check the occurrence in a case-insensitive mode with stristr() OR stripos()?

In my case it doesn't matter in which exact position the given string is (if any), or how many times it occurs in the other one (if any), the only important question is if it even exists in the other string.

I've already found some comments about differences of speed in various articles (e.g. on php.net, someone says strstr() is faster in case there is a !== false check after strpos), but now I can't decide which is true.

If you know about any better methods of searching a string in another, please let me know!

Thank you very much for the relevant comments!

============

An example:


$mystring = 'blahblahblah';  
$findme = 'bla';  

if(strstr($mystring, $findme)){  
   echo 'got it';  
}  
else{  
   echo 'none';  
}  

echo PHP_EOL;

if(strpos($mystring, $findme) !== false){  
   echo 'got it';  
}  
else{  
   echo 'none';  
}  


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marked as duplicate by Alix Axel, pst, Jason McCreary, Framework, meagar Apr 28 '11 at 17:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
This is a micro micro optimization in my opinion. But I'm curious the answer ;) –  Jason McCreary Apr 28 '11 at 15:58
    
This was asked (again) less than one hour ago... –  Alix Axel Apr 28 '11 at 15:59
1  
Execute them 10.000 times and measure time before and after, you'll know which one is faster. –  Capsule Apr 28 '11 at 16:00
    
Alix, you're right, I'm sorry for that, I didn't find this one. Capsule: this was a good idea, in the meantime I already made a test, I will post it soon. –  Sk8erPeter Apr 28 '11 at 16:47
    
aw, didn't think I get a downvote for being a little bit inattentive :(( –  Sk8erPeter Apr 28 '11 at 19:14
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7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

strpos seems to be in the lead, I've tested it with finding some strings in 'The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog':

  • strstr used 0.48487210273743 microseconds for 1000000 iterations finding 'quick'
  • strpos used 0.40836095809937 microseconds for 1000000 iterations finding 'quick'
  • strstr used 0.45261287689209 microseconds for 1000000 iterations finding 'dog'
  • strpos used 0.39890813827515 microseconds for 1000000 iterations finding 'dog'
<?php

    $haystack = 'The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog';

    $needle = 'quick';

    $iter = 1000000;

    $start = microtime(true);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $iter; $i++) {
        strstr($haystack, $needle);
    }
    $duration = microtime(true) - $start;
    echo "<br/>strstr used $duration microseconds for $iter iterations finding 'quick' in 'The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog'";

    $start = microtime(true);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $iter; $i++) {
        strpos($haystack, $needle);
    }
    $duration = microtime(true) - $start;
    echo "<br/>strpos used $duration microseconds for $iter iterations finding 'quick' in 'The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog'";

    $needle = 'dog';

    $start = microtime(true);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $iter; $i++) {
        strstr($haystack, $needle);
    }
    $duration = microtime(true) - $start;
    echo "<br/>strstr used $duration microseconds for $iter iterations finding 'dog' in 'The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog'";

    $start = microtime(true);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $iter; $i++) {
        strpos($haystack, $needle);
    }
    $duration = microtime(true) - $start;
    echo "<br/>strpos used $duration microseconds for $iter iterations finding 'dog' in 'The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog'";

?>
share|improve this answer
    
Nice job, I believe this bench already was @ phpbench.com (if only it was up)! –  Alix Axel Apr 28 '11 at 16:20
    
Another one: net-beta.net/ubench/index.php?t=strpos1. –  Alix Axel Apr 28 '11 at 16:24
    
thanks for the benchmark, in the meantime I also made mine: bit.ly/mDE7sL . –  Sk8erPeter Apr 28 '11 at 19:13
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From the PHP Docs:

Note:

If you only want to determine if a particular needle occurs within haystack, use the faster and less memory intensive function strpos() instead.

I'm willing to take their word for it :)

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Finally a real answer with sources and proofs. –  Matthieu Napoli Apr 28 '11 at 16:03
2  
@Matthieu, I assume you're being facetious. –  Jason McCreary Apr 28 '11 at 16:09
    
@Matthieu There is no "source and proof" there. "Proof" would be a real-live benchmark with expected input and usage that could be repeatedly run. –  user166390 Apr 28 '11 at 16:09
    
wow, thank you, I didn't notice this official info, while it was in front of my eyes, I just would have to open them :D:D –  Sk8erPeter Apr 28 '11 at 16:56
1  
Facetious, gotcha. ;) –  Jason McCreary Apr 28 '11 at 17:30
show 1 more comment

The faster way is:

if (strpos($haystack, $needle) !== false)

The case insensitive versions should obviouslly be slower (at least 2x slower, I expect).


strncmp() / substr() can possibly perform better iff you're checking if $haystack starts with $needle and if $haystack is considerably long (> hundreds chars or so).


Benchmark:

See other benchmarks @ http://net-beta.net/ubench/ (search for strpos).


A pratical example where this kind of optimizations (kind of) do matter - calculating hashcashes:

$count = 0;
$hashcash = sprintf('1:20:%u:%s::%u:', date('ymd'), $to, mt_rand());

while (strncmp('00000', sha1($hashcash . $count), 5) !== 0)
{
    ++$count;
}

$header['X-Hashcash'] = $hashcash . $count;
share|improve this answer
    
you find out the duplicate and answered as well. Do not think both are different things? –  Framework Apr 28 '11 at 16:04
    
@Shakti Singh: No, because this one has another detail (the case insensitivity). –  Alix Axel Apr 28 '11 at 16:09
    
In this case you must remove your comment or answer otherwise it is creating confusion for some persons –  Framework Apr 28 '11 at 16:15
    
@Shakti Singh: I don't have to do anything, the comment is automatic FYI and the main question is exactly the same - I don't see a reason not to close it. –  Alix Axel Apr 28 '11 at 16:18
    
As your wish I thought it should be –  Framework Apr 28 '11 at 16:20
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According to the php manpages, strpos is faster and less memory intensive than strstr.

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Trick question. They do two different things. One returns the substring, the other returns the starting position of the substring withing the string. The real answer is you are comparing apples to oranges, use which one you need.

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+1 The only answer thus far that doesn't focus on a u-optimization. –  user166390 Apr 28 '11 at 16:01
3  
The question ain't tricky: fastest way to find the occurrence of a string in another string. –  Alix Axel Apr 28 '11 at 16:03
    
@Alix Axel And it's ... still a trick question. This can't be answered without a performance analysis as the expected input must be considered (string and match position). The best is to say "use the correct function". –  user166390 Apr 28 '11 at 16:07
1  
@Crayon Violent: I still disagree, strstr() internally is the same as substr() + strpos() so it will always be slower (and consume more memory since it returns a string). Either way, the "correct function" for the OP question is str[i]pos(). –  Alix Axel Apr 28 '11 at 16:13
    
It's interesting that in the meantime I tried my own benchmark many times (I will post it), and I had to find out it's not calculable and/or certain that strstr is always slower. For example my last test's result: strstr(): 1.17782998, strpos() !== false: 1.191504, which means strstr was 0.01367402 faster... Hmmm. So maybe it depends. –  Sk8erPeter Apr 28 '11 at 16:52
show 3 more comments

If the string A against which you want to find an occurrence of a pattern B, then the fastest way is to build a Suffix Tree of A and perform against it searches for B.

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Could you explain a little bit better what you exactly mean? –  Sk8erPeter Apr 28 '11 at 19:18
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I would think that strpos() would be faster because it only returns an integer (or false if no match was found). strstr() returns a string which contains all text after and including the first match.

For case insensitive searches, I would think that these would be slightly slower because they have to perform extra checks ("do the two chars match? if no, is the char a letter? if yes, does it match the lowercase version? if no, does it match the upper case version?", etc)

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