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Is this a valid and optimized way to avoid double checked locks:

public class SomeBaseClass
{
     protected static object InitializeLock = new object();
     protected static bool IsInitialized = false;

     public void SomeFunction()
     {
         if (!IsInitialized)
         {
             System.Threading.Thread.MemoryBarrier();
             lock (InitializeLock)
             {
                 // do init stuff
                 IsInitialized = true;
             }
     }

     //Do stuff that have to happen when function is called
    }
}

With this being the double-checked alternative:

public class SomeBaseClass
{
     protected static object InitializeLock = new object();
     protected static bool IsInitialized = false;

     public void SomeFunction()
     {
         if (!IsInitialized)
         {
             lock (InitializeLock)
             {
                 if (!IsInitialized)
                 {                              
                     // do init stuff
                     IsInitialized = true;
                 }
             }
         }

     //Do stuff that have to happen when function is called
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Isn't the lock statement an implicit memory barrier? –  spender Apr 28 '11 at 16:44
    
yeah well I kinda asked this question to figure that out I think... The way I read the documentation was that memorybarrier made sure that no other thread could come in at the point where it was called, but I probably just misunderstood it completely... –  Casper Leon Nielsen Apr 28 '11 at 16:46
1  
@spender it is, but first if is outside of it. So if field is not volatile it is not good. –  Andrey Apr 28 '11 at 16:52
    
I think I got the solution you're looking for, check my answer. –  Lirik Apr 28 '11 at 17:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, because thread switch can happen right after two threads pass if (!IsInitialized)

There is a great article where this topic is explained in context of creating singleton: http://csharpindepth.com/Articles/General/Singleton.aspx (by Jon Skeet)

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I read that a few times already and was thinking I had come up with a whole new way of solving the issue, but of course I wasnt that clever at all ... ;) –  Casper Leon Nielsen Apr 28 '11 at 16:54
    
@Casper Leon Nielsen it is not about being clever. I guess there is just nothing more to say on this topic :) –  Andrey Apr 28 '11 at 16:58

This is the second time this question has come up today. See:

C# manual lock/unlock

The short answer to your question is no, that is absolutely not valid. If the non-volatile read of "IsInitialized" is reordered with respect to the non-volatile read of whatever state is being initialized then the code path never has a memory barrier on it of any sort, and therefore the reads can be re-ordered, and therefore "IsInitialized" can be true while the out-of-date cached uninitialized state is still good.

What you have to do is either (1) don't do double-checked locking; it is dangerous, or (2) ensure that there is always at least one volatile read of IsInitialized to prevent reads of the initialized state being moved backwards in time.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer Eric –  Casper Leon Nielsen Apr 29 '11 at 7:39

You can help the check by making the IsInitialized flag volatile which will prevent other threads from caching it (a very minor improvement since you're locking), but you still need the flag after you're locking. In other words, you can't avoid the double-checked lock unless you use some tricky initialization.

However, you can do away with the locks if you re-design your class and if you go to an optimistic approach of changing the state... this should work like a charm:

public class Internals
{
    private readonly bool IsInitialized;

    public Internals(bool initialized)
    {
        IsInitialized = initialized;
    }
}


public class SomeBaseClass
{        
    protected static Internals internals = new Internals(false);

    public void SomeFunction()
    {
        do
        {
            Internals previous = internals;
        }while(!previous.IsInitialized && previous != Interlocked.CompareExchange(internals, new Internals(true), previous))
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The MemoryBarrier call in your first example is completely superfluous since the subsequent lock call creates an implicit memory barrier anyway.

Even if you moved the memory barrier before the first IsInitialized check, the code is still unsafe: there's a window for the thread to be interrupted between the IsInitialized check and the lock statement. That's why you generally need a second IsInitialized check inside the lock block.

share|improve this answer
    
yours is also right and explains why better, but andrey was quicker on the trigger and he was correct too :) –  Casper Leon Nielsen Apr 28 '11 at 17:02

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