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So i'm currently doing the exercices in my programming book "Programming: Principles and practice using c++" from Bjarne Stroustrup and i'm curently stuck at one exercice. Basically, the exercice is to write a program that bleeps out words it doesn't like. The way it works is that the user inputs a string and the program repeats the word. If the word the user enters is part of the dislike vector, the word is replaced by "Bleep". (I don't know if I explained this right, but it shouldn't be to complicated to understand).

This is my version of the program:

int main()
{
    string dislike = "Potato";
    string words = " ";

    cout << "Please enter some words: " << endl;
    while(cin>>words)
    {
        if(words==dislike)
        {
            cout << "Bleep!" << endl;
        }

        else
        {
            cout << words << endl;
        }
    }
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

As you can see, this version isn't using vectors (and it should, because the exercice is right after the explanation of vectors in the chapter). So my question is, how can I implement a vector with many "dislike" words in it like this:

vector<string>dislike;
dislike.push_back("Potatoes");
dislike.push_back("Peanuts");
dislike.push_back("Coconut");

and make it so it works like my other version without vectors (repeats words, but bleeps the dislike words). I can't seem to understand how to navigate in a vector so that it only bleeps the "dislike" words.

If someone could give me a hand and explain to me how it works (please do not just give me the answer) it would be very appreciated.

Thank you for your time and help, learning c++ alone isn't always simple, and I thank this website for making my learning curve a bit easier.

bobicool

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Ok, let me explain a simple approach to it. There are more elegant ones, but for now it's important that you get a feeling of how std::vector can be accessed and how to compose control structures correctly.

Step 1 - looping through all elements of a vector

You can use iterators to go through all elements of a vector.

for(vector<string>::const_iterator it = dislike.begin(); it != dislike.end(); ++it) {

   // now *it gives access to the current element (here: current dislike word)
   if (*it == words) {
       // ... yeah, we found out the current word is on the list!
   }         
}

You get an iterator to the first element in a vector by calling begin(), then keep incrementing (++it) it until you reached the end of the vector. I use const_iterator here because I'm not going to modify any elements, if you need to, use iterator.

with a std::vector, indexing via [index] is also possible (but not recommended, usually):

for(size_t i = 0;i < dislike.size(); ++i) {
   // dislike[i] is the current element

   if (dislike[i] == words) {
      // huuuuray! another BEEEP candidate
   }
}

Step 2 - break the loop early

As soon as you know what for sure that we have a dislike word, you don't need to search the vector further.

for(vector<string>::const_iterator it = dislike.begin(); it != dislike.end(); ++it) {   
  if (*it == words) {
     // we found a positive match, so beep and get out of here
     cout << "Bleep!" << endl;
     break;
  }         
}

Step 3 - make a note if we handled a word already

bool is_beep = false;
for(vector<string>::const_iterator it = dislike.begin(); it != dislike.end(); ++it) {   
  if (*it == words) {
     // we found a positive match, so beep and get out of here
     cout << "Bleep!" << endl;
     is_beep = true;
     break;
  }         
}
// this is not a dislike word if is_beep is false, so print it as usual
if (!is_beep) {
   cout << words << endl;
}

Step 4 - putting it all together

int main()
{
    vector<string>dislike;
    dislike.push_back("Potatoes");
    dislike.push_back("Peanuts");
    dislike.push_back("Coconut");
    string words = " ";

    cout << "Please enter some words: " << endl;
    while(cin>>words)
    {
        bool is_beep = false;
        for(vector<string>::const_iterator it = dislike.begin(); it != dislike.end(); ++it) {   
           if (*it == words) {
            // we found a positive match, so beep and get out of here
            cout << "Bleep!" << endl;
            is_beep = true;
            break;
          }         
        }
       // this is not a dislike word if is_beep is false, so print it as usual
       if (!is_beep) {
            cout << words << endl;
       }
    }
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

Check out std::find for a more idiomatic solution - it basically saves you the inner loop. You can also get rid of that bool in the last code sample if you re-structure a bit. I'll leave that as an exercise to you (hint: keep the iterator alive and check out its value after terminating the loop).

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While the answers after you have a more simple approach, I chose your answer as the final answer because you took the time to explain step by step how to solve the problem. Thanks a lot =) –  bobicool Apr 28 '11 at 18:16
    
But, I never saw the "it" operator before, can I have more explanation on that? –  bobicool Apr 28 '11 at 18:19
    
It's not an operator - it's a variable name, initialized here: for(vector<string>::const_iterator it = dislike.begin(). –  Alexander Gessler Apr 28 '11 at 18:20
    
Have a look at cprogramming.com/tutorial/stl/iterators.html for more information on iterators. –  Alexander Gessler Apr 28 '11 at 18:21
int main()
{
    vector<string> dislike;
    dislike.push_back("Potatoes");
    dislike.push_back("Peanuts");
    dislike.push_back("Coconut");
    string words;

    cout << "Please enter some words: " << endl;
    while(cin >> words)
    {
        if(find(dislike.begin(), dislike.end(), words) != dislike.end())
        {
            cout << "Bleep!" << endl;
        }

        else
        {
            cout << words << endl;
        }
    }
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

For std::find add #include <algorithm> to your source.

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-1 What part of "please do not just give me the answer" do you not understand? –  Chris Jester-Young Apr 28 '11 at 16:46
    
This code doesn't need explanations because: 1. this is same code the OP post in his question, just std::find is added. 2. I think it is quiet clear what find is do here. I don't think my answer is so dummy or useless to get downvote. –  Mihran Hovsepyan Apr 28 '11 at 16:50
    
Fine, I've pulled my downvote. –  Chris Jester-Young Apr 28 '11 at 16:51
    
I agree, I wish someone told me about these methods sooner because everyone gets bitten by search in a container bugs. –  Eric Fortin Apr 28 '11 at 16:52

use std::find(your_vector.begin(), your_vector.end(), words)

int main()
{
    vector<string>dislike;
    dislike.push_back("Potatoes");
    dislike.push_back("Peanuts");
    dislike.push_back("Coconut");
    string words = " ";

    cout << "Please enter some words: " << endl;
    while(cin>>words)
    {
        if(std::find(dislike.begin(), dislike.end(), words) != dislike.end())
        {
            cout << "Bleep!" << endl;
        }

        else
        {
            cout << words << endl;
        }
    }
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 What part of "please do not just give me the answer" do you not understand? –  Chris Jester-Young Apr 28 '11 at 16:47

Here is my solution to that particular question in the book when i was reading it. :) hope it's self-explanatory.

/*THE QUESTION GOES LIKE;
Write a program that “bleeps” out words that you don’t like; that is, you read in words    
using cin and print them again on cout. If a word is among a few you have defined, you
write out BLEEP instead of that word. Start with one “disliked word” such as string
disliked = “Broccoli”; 
When that works, add a few more.*/



#include "std_lib_facilities.h"  // this is a standard library header that came with 
the book

int main () {
vector<string> dislike = {"Dislike", "Alike", "Hello", "Water"};   /* defining a vector  
for the disliked words. */

vector<string> words;  //initializing vector for the read words.

cout << "Please enter some words\n";   //prompt user to enter some words.

for( string word; cin >> word;)  //this current word typed is read in.

    words.push_back(word);   // word read in are pushed into the vector "words".

sort(words);  /* function for the standard library for sorting data...this makes the data from the vector "words" appears in alphabetical order. */

for (int i=0; i<words.size(); ++i){   /*this acts as an iterator. and goes through all the element of the vector "words".  */

    if(i==0 || words[i-1]!=words[i]){   /*this prevents the words from repeating....just an option incase the user enters same kinda words twice or more. */

        if(words[i]!=dislike[0] && words[i]!=dislike[1] && words[i]!=dislike[2] && words[i]!=dislike[3])  /*This test checks whether the words typed match any of the elements of the vector "dislike".if they don't match;   */

            cout << words[i]<< '\n';  //prints out the words.
        else
            cout << "BlEEP!\n";   //if they match....print out "BlEEP!".
       }
   }


}
share|improve this answer

I am learning C++. This Program has been changed some. Write a program that "bleeps" out bad words that you don't like; that is, you read in words using cin and print them again on cout. If a word is among a few you have defined, you write out BLEEP and or have it to BLEEP(Sound) instead of that word. Start with one "bad word" such as -- string badword = "arse"; When that works, add a few more or write a whole program based on all the bad words that you do not want printed out.

while (cin >> words)
{
    if(find(badwords.begin(), badwords.end(),words) !=badwords.end())
    {
        cout << "      " << endl; // You can put Bleep in or leave it out (Blank) if blank
                                  // it will leave a blank in the phrase when it prints
        Beep(523,500);            // This is to Bleep (Sound) when a bad word is found
        cin.get();                
    }
    else
    {
        cout << words << endl;
    }
}

Since someone gave the answer I have Changed the program some. That is for you to learn. This runs on Visual Studio Express 2012

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