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I have this weird situation that I don't understand. I'm reading "Programming in Scala" book, Ch. 9.

Let's say I have a curried function:

def withThis(n:Int)(op:Int=>Unit){
      println("Before")
      op(n);
      println("After")
}

When I call it with one argument inside a special curly-syntax it works as expected:

withThis(5){
   (x) => {println("Hello!"); println(x); }
}
// Outputs
Before
Hello!
5
After

However, if I put two statements, I get something wierd:

withThis(5){
     println("Hello!")
     println(_)
}
// Outputs
Hello!
Before
5
After

How come the "Hello!" gets printed before "Before" and then "5" is printed inside? Am I crazy?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Your last code example should be rewritten as follows to produce the expected result:

withThis(5) { x =>
     println("Hello!")
     println(x)
}

Otherwise, your example is equivalent to

withThis(5) {
     println("Hello!")
     (x: Int) => println(x)
}

as the placeholder _ will be expanded to bind as tightly as possible in a non-degenerated way (i.e., it wouldn't expand to println(x => x)).

The other thing to note is that a block always returns its last value. In your example, the last value is actually (x: Int) => println(x).

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2  
But println(x => x) is not even correct syntax. In any case - I understand what println(_) does - I was more confusing as to this "block" business. –  drozzy Apr 28 '11 at 18:34
    
The syntax is correct. It wouldn't compile in this case because of the missing parameter type, but would work if the compiler could infer it. Trivial example: def doit(f: Int => Int) = (); doit(x => x) –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Apr 28 '11 at 18:37
    
I know that it is equivalent "(x: Int) => println(x)", my question is why does it actually execute println first. I guess you answered with "block always returns the last value". Does this mean that blocks are not lazily evaluated? –  drozzy May 2 '11 at 16:55
    
You're right, blocks are not lazily evaluated in this context. –  Jean-Philippe Pellet May 3 '11 at 8:02

In your second example the part in curlies: { println("Hello!"); println(_) } is a block which prints "Hello!" and returns a curried println. Imagine it simplified as { println("Hello!"); 5 }, a block which prints "Hello!" and returns 5.

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I don't think I got to "blocks" part in the book yet. That is why I am confused probably. –  drozzy Apr 28 '11 at 18:09
    
So there is no way to make it work as expected in the second example? I tried with by-name parameters - but they don't take an argument. –  drozzy Apr 28 '11 at 18:35
    
Just to be picky: the block doesn't return a “curried println”, but an anonymous function with one argument that calls println with the argument it gets. –  Jean-Philippe Pellet Apr 28 '11 at 18:45
    
I suspect you get it. "Block" is just lambda with anonymous arguments. But yours is being parsed as () => () => Unit, evaluated, and its curried result passed to withThis(5). Did you try JP's x => at the top of your block? That should prevent parsing it as () => …. The lesson for me is be wary using inferred arguments. –  Toland Apr 29 '11 at 4:39

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