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I have a logo that is residing at the public/images/logo.gif . Here is my nodejs code.

http.createServer(function(req, res){
  res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain' });
  res.end('Hello World \n');
}).listen(8080, '127.0.0.1');

It works but when I request for localhost:8080/logo.gif then I obviously I don't get the logo.

What changes I need to do to serve an image.

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5 Answers 5

I agree with the other posters that eventually, you should use a framework, such as Express.. but first you should also understand how to do something fundamental like this without a library, to really understand what the library abstracts away for you.. The steps are

  1. Parse the incoming HTTP request, to see which path the user is asking for
  2. Add a pathway in conditional statement for the server to respond to
  3. If the image is requested, read the image file from the disk.
  4. Serve the image content-type in a header
  5. Serve the image contents in the body

The code would look something like this (not tested)

fs = require('fs');
http = require('http');
url = require('url');


http.createServer(function(req, res){
  var request = url.parse(req.url, true);
  var action = request.pathname;

  if (action == '/logo.gif') {
     var img = fs.readFileSync('./logo.gif');
     res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'image/gif' });
     res.end(img, 'binary');
  } else { 
     res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain' });
     res.end('Hello World \n');
  }
}).listen(8080, '127.0.0.1');
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14  
You shouldn't use readFileSync in the middle of a response. Either a sync load should be used on the first tic or the async method should be used. codr.cc/s/5d0b73d6/js –  generalhenry Apr 29 '11 at 3:01
    
I'm on board with you on the sync version, for the async version though, I thought the danger of using non-blocking operations for files, was that it could send the response before the entire file was read, and end up leaving you with a partial file being served to the user? Do you need to use chunked encoding if you use an async file read? –  noli Apr 29 '11 at 3:08
    
fs.readFileSync doesn't callback until the whole file is loaded so there's no need for chunk handling. Chunk handling is mostly for network file transfer (since things can take longer than expected). –  generalhenry Apr 29 '11 at 4:41
8  
The line res.end(img); should be res.end(img, 'binary');. Good work! –  Honza Pokorny Jul 1 '11 at 22:46
    
You should also know what the framework does, because sometimes it's just easier for simpler sites and although its more complex, bigger sites will be more customizable. The main advantage is if express doesn't help you in certain scenarios, you can just code native http server instead of looking through forums and documentation. –  user2864278 Oct 20 '13 at 7:14

You should use the express framework.

npm install express

var express = require('express');
var app = express.createServer();
app.use(express.static(__dirname + '/public'));
app.listen(8080);

and then the url localhost:8080/images/logo.gif should work

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You need to use a library that is aware of URLs and static files. I recommend using Express. It has facilities for setting up routes, and a static file serving module.

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I like using Restify for REST services. In my case, I had created a REST service to serve up images and then if an image source returned 404/403, I wanted to return an alternative image. Here's what I came up with combining some of the stuff here:

function processRequest(req, res, next, url) {
    var httpOptions = {
        hostname: host,
        path: url,
        port: port,
        method: 'GET'
    };

    var reqGet = http.request(httpOptions, function (response) {
        var statusCode = response.statusCode;

        // Many images come back as 404/403 so check explicitly
        if (statusCode === 404 || statusCode === 403) {
            // Send default image if error
            var file = 'img/user.png';
            fs.stat(file, function (err, stat) {
                var img = fs.readFileSync(file);
                res.contentType = 'image/png';
                res.contentLength = stat.size;
                res.end(img, 'binary');
            });

        } else {
            var idx = 0;
            var len = parseInt(response.header("Content-Length"));
            var body = new Buffer(len);

            response.setEncoding('binary');

            response.on('data', function (chunk) {
                body.write(chunk, idx, "binary");
                idx += chunk.length;
            });

            response.on('end', function () {
                res.contentType = 'image/jpg';
                res.send(body);
            });

        }
    });

    reqGet.on('error', function (e) {
        // Send default image if error
        var file = 'img/user.png';
        fs.stat(file, function (err, stat) {
            var img = fs.readFileSync(file);
            res.contentType = 'image/png';
            res.contentLength = stat.size;
            res.end(img, 'binary');
        });
    });

    reqGet.end();

    return next();
}
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In SiteBoot you can place all of your images in "content" folder.

mkdir mysite; cd mysite
npm install siteboot
cp image.jpg content/
node server.js

Then go to:

http://localhost:8000/image.jpg 

and it should work.

https://github.com/mkschreder/siteboot.js

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