Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm interesting in improving my javascript code to be properly OOP.... currently I tend to do something like this:

jQuery(document).ready(function () {
    Page.form = (function () {
        return {
            //generate a new PDF
            generatePDF: function () {

            },
            //Update the list of PDFs available for download
            updatePDFDownloads: function () {

            },
            /*
             * Field specific functionality
             */
            field: (function () {
                return {
                    //show the edit prompt
                    edit: function (id, name) {

                    },
                    //refresh the value of a field with the latest from the database
                    refresh: function (id) {

                    }
                };
            }())
        };
    }());
});

In the end it's just mainly organized functions I suppose... what's a good resource where I can learn to program javascript in an OOP manner, or what suggestions would you have for improving my current style of programming?

It seems like I should do a sort of model prototype and have my form object inherit from that prototype.

(I'm using jQuery instead of $ because of conflicts with prototypeJS)

share|improve this question
1  
What reasons do you have to want to go 'proper' OOP? I my view OOP is not necessarily something to achieve. You can do fine without. Your example looks more like a closure than inheritance based OOP. –  Halcyon Apr 28 '11 at 19:27
    
Yeah, my example isn't OOP, but I'm wanting to make sure I'm on track with the highest quality JS.... –  Webnet Apr 28 '11 at 19:33
1  
"highest quality js" isn't synonymous with bloat; if you can achieve a great system with a two-function object (and no proper OOP), there's no reason to switch to it (unless you're planning on enhancing the existing features). I'm not arguing against using proper OOP, I'm just saying that not going OOP doesn't make your code smell. –  Christian Apr 28 '11 at 20:27
    
I wrote a post about what makes up correct JS inheritance, if you do find that OO will be helpful in a project. js-bits.blogspot.com/2010/08/… –  Juan Mendes Jul 13 '12 at 23:30

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your question is quite broad so I don't think a complete answer is possible here. But here are a few points.

Regarding the code you have shown. You're jumping a couple of redundant hoops.

  1. Unless you're accessing the DOM in some way, there is no need to wrap your code in jQuery(document).ready()
  2. There is no need to return an object from a self calling anonymous function unless you're closing over some private functions or data

The object you have created can be created more simply (a good thing) like this

var Page = {
    form: {
        //generate a new PDF
        generatePDF: function () {

        },
        //Update the list of PDFs available for download
        updatePDFDownloads: function () {

        },
        /*
        * Field specific functionality
        */
        field: {
            //show the edit prompt
            edit: function (id, name) {

            },
            //refresh the value of a field with the latest from the database
            refresh: function (id) {

            }
        }
    }
};

It's easier to read and less confusing, only do things that buy you something. see cargo cult programming

Here's an example using a self calling anonymous function to create private members

var Obj = (function() {
    privateFunction( param ) {
        // do something with param
    }

    var privateVar = 10;

    return {
        // publicMethod has access to privateFunction and privateVar
        publicMethod: function() {
            return privateFunction( privateVar );
        }
    }

})();

The structure you have used, object literals are very good, as you say, at grouping a set of functions (methods) and properties. This is a kind of namespace. It is also a way of creating a Singleton. You may also want to create many objects of the same Class.
JavaScript doesn't have classes like traditional OO languages (I'll get to that) but at the simplest level it's very easy to create a 'template' for creating objects of a particular type. These 'templates' are normal functions called constructors.

// a constructor
// it creates a drink with a particular thirst quenchingness
function Drink( quenchingness ) {
    this.quenchingness = quenchingness;
}

// all drinks created with the Drink constructor get the chill method
// which works on their own particular quenchingness
Drink.prototype.chill = function() {
   this.quenchingness *= 2; //twice as thirst quenching
}

var orange = new Drink( 10 );
var beer   = new Drink( 125 );

var i_will_have = ( orange.quenchingness > beer.quenchingness ) 
    ? orange 
    : beer; //beer

var beer2  = new Drink( 125 );
beer2.chill();

var i_will_have = ( beer2.quenchingness > beer.quenchingness )
    ? beer2 
    : beer; //beer2 - it's been chilled!

There's a lot to know about constructors. You'll have to search around. There are lots of examples on SO.
Inheritance, the foundation of OO, is not that intuitive in js because it is prototypal. I won't go into that here because you will more than likely not use js's native prototypal inheritance paradigm directly.
This is because there are libraries that mimic classical inheritance very effectively, Prototype (inheritance) or mootools (Class) for example. There are others.

Many say that inheritance is overused in OO and that you should favour composition and this brings me to what I initially set out to recommend when I started this rambling answer.

Design patterns in JavaScript are as useful as in any OO language and you should familiarise yourself with them

I recommend you read Pro JavaScript Design Patterns. There, that's it

share|improve this answer

There isn't one correct way... Some people use a framework to define their object, I like to just extend prototype directly. Anyhow, I wanted to say that Oran Looney has some good posts on OO mechanics in JS:

http://oranlooney.com/classes-and-objects-javascript/

Its also worth looking at his other articles:

http://oranlooney.com/deep-copy-javascript/ http://oranlooney.com/functional-javascript/

share|improve this answer

The top 3 I suggest to read is

  1. JavaScript and Object Oriented Programming (OOP)

  2. Classical Inheritance in JavaScript

  3. Prototypal Inheritance in JavaScript

Have a nice reading!

share|improve this answer
    
If that matters, I'm still learning Javascript but I also tend (and like a lot) to organize code encapsulating functions within functions. –  Guandalino Apr 28 '11 at 20:51
    
+1 for the Douglas Crockford references :) –  Hristo Apr 28 '11 at 20:52

The code we are using follows this basic structure:

//Create and define Global NameSpace Object
( function(GlobalObject, $, undefined) 
{
    GlobalObject.Method = function()
    {
        ///<summary></summary>
    }

}) (GlobalObject = GlobalObject || {}, jQuery);

//New object for specific functionality
( function(Functionality.Events, $, undefined)
{
    //Member Variables 
    var Variable; // (Used for) , (type)

    // Initialize
    GlobalObject.Functionality.Events.Init = function()
    {
        ///<summary></summary>
    }

    // public method
    this.PublicMethod = function(oParam)
    {
        ///<summary></summary>
        ///<param type=""></param>
    }

    // protected method (typically define in global object, but can be made available from here)
    GlobalObject.Functionality.ProtectedMethod = function()
    {
        ///<summary></summary>
    }

    // internal method (typically define in global object, but can be made available from here)
    GlobalObject.InternalMethod = function()
    {
        ///<summary></summary>
    }

    // private method
    var privateMethod = function()
    {
        ///<summary></summary>
    }
}) (GlobalObject.Funcitonality.Events = GlobalObject.Funcitonality.Events || {}, jQuery )

The strength to this is that it initializes the Global object automatically, allows you to maintain the intergrity of your code, and organizes each piece of functionality into a specific grouping by your definition. This structure is solid, presenting all of the basic syntactical things you would expect from OOP without the key words. Even setting up intelisense is possible with javascript, and then defining each peice and referencing them makes writing javascript cleaner and more manageable. Hope this layout helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting... so you're saying your average IDE would be able to pick up the intelisense from this? –  Webnet Oct 25 '12 at 18:52
    
Visual studio does as long as you have a reference to the js files you are using. And as far as in the same file, it's working for me! I'll try to find the site where I found the information on it and post that as well.. –  Brett Weber Oct 25 '12 at 20:05
    

I dont think it matters what language you use, good OOP is good OOP. I like to split up my concerns as much as possible by using an MVC architecture. Since JavaScript is very event based, I also use the observer design pattern mostly.

Heres a tutorial you can read about MVC using jQuery.

share|improve this answer
2  
First of, jQuery and Prototype are not languages (you seem to imply they are?). Secondly, MVC!="good OOP". No, I'm not saying MVS is bad, I'm saying MVC is bad to have one object with 3 functions just to eventually show a single alert box. That's called over-engineering bloat. Oh, and wonder of wonders, MVC isn't the only way to code OOP, in fact, MVC easily makes OOP useless (by following strict MVC rules as opposed to proper coding). –  Christian Apr 28 '11 at 20:36
    
WHOA, it seems like somebodies got their panties on backwards. Not exactly sure what the attitudes all about, I was just giving my two cents. When you happen to have a large system that relies heavily on AJAX server calls, MVC works well and is easy to maintain and reuse. Yeah, there are other ways, I'm just trying to give options. –  BDuelz Apr 28 '11 at 23:16
    
No you're just trying to enforce a common practice for the sake of its reputation. –  Christian Apr 29 '11 at 6:30
    
I dont think I was trying to "enforce" anything. My answer clearly says "I like", not "You should" or any other words that would imply I was trying to enforce my views onto anybody. In any case, whats done is done. –  BDuelz Apr 29 '11 at 7:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.