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Is there any constraint onto compareTo method which orders objects put into the standard java TreeSet (i.e. collection implemented as Red-Black tree)? I have

public class RuleTuple implements Comparable {
    String head;
    String[] rhs;
    public String toString() {
        StringBuffer b = new StringBuffer();
        b.append(head+":"); 
        for( String t: rhs ) 
           b.append(" "+t); 
        return b.toString();
    }
    public int compareTo(Object obj) {
        RuleTuple src = (RuleTuple)obj;
        int cmp = head.compareTo(src.head);
        if( cmp!=0 )
            return cmp;
        if( rhs.length != src.rhs.length )
            return rhs.length - src.rhs.length;
        for( int i=0; i<rhs.length; i++ )
            if( rhs[i].compareTo(src.rhs[i]) != 0 )
                return rhs[i].compareTo(src.rhs[i]);
        return 0;
    }
    ...
}

I assumed that any method mapping object into linear order is fine, as long as it meets partial order criteria: reflexivity, asymmetry, and transitivity. Among those only transitivity is not immediately obvious, but it seems to me that if objects are compared by ranked criteria transitivity follows. (I compare headers first, if identical, then compare lengths of rhs, if identical, then compare array's elements.)

Apparently, the RuleTuple.compareTo() method is not consistent, since when deleting "test: test[22,33)" it traverses the tree in the following sequence:

test[22,33): 'HAVING' condition               <-- comparison#1
   test: test[4,19) group_by_clause           <-- comparison#2
       test: model_clause                     <-- comparison#3
           test: group_by_clause
              test:
              test: test[22,33)
           test: group_by_clause test[22,33)  <-- comparison#4; wrong branch!
              test: test[4,19)                <-- comparison#5
              test: group_by_clause model_clause
                  ...
       test: test[4,19) group_by_clause model_clause
        ...
   test[4,19): test[5,8) test[8,11)
        ...

As a result it fails to find and delete an object which is there on the tree. Is my intuition correct?

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1  
Another condition is "temporary consistence", i.e. the result of comparing two objects should not change as long as they are used as keys in the TreeMap. This means your keys should not change, essentially. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 28 '11 at 22:36
    
This may be the key (pun intended)! I do transform (substitute rules) in place. Argh, there is always a problem when taking shortcut... –  Tegiri Nenashi Apr 28 '11 at 22:40
    
What happens when this.head == null, but src.head != null? I think you would get a NullPointerException on switching the viewpoint. Also, you might think about not invoking rhs[i].compareTo(src.rhs[i]) twice. (This is only an optimization, not the reason for your problem, which I don't really understand.) Apart from this (and that you should use generics here), your compareTo method looks fine. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 28 '11 at 22:43
1  
To avoid the consistence problem: Remove the rule from the set/map, change it, add it again. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 28 '11 at 22:45
    
I edited the post, as null issue was not relevant. After fixing the mutation issue as Paulo suggested, the code seems to work fine. –  Tegiri Nenashi Apr 28 '11 at 22:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Another (often overlooked) condition for a Comparator and Comparable is "temporary consistence", i.e. the result of comparing two objects should not change as long as they are used as keys in the TreeMap (or any other structure where you use the Comparator/Comparable, like a sorted array used for Collections.binarySearch, or a PriorityQueue implemented by a minimum heap - even for Arrays.sort you should not change the elements before the sorting is finished).

This essentially means that your keys should not change, at least not in a way that there order changes.

The reason is that the TreeMap assumes that the nodes of the binary tree are always in the right order - only because of this it can work in O(log(n)) instead of O(n) for lookup and changes.

If you have to change a key, you should first remove it from the structure, then change it, then add it again.

(The same is valid for equals and hashCode of keys in hash-based structures like HashMap, by the way.)


As an added bonus, here is a generics-using variant of your code:

public class RuleTuple implements Comparable<RuleTuple> {
    String head;
    String[] rhs;
    public String toString() {
        StringBuilder b = new StringBuilder();
        b.append(head+":"); 
        for( String t: rhs ) 
           b.append(" "+t); 
        return b.toString();
    }
    public int compareTo(RuleTuple src) {
        int cmp = head.compareTo(src.head);
        if( cmp!=0 )
            return cmp;
        if( rhs.length != src.rhs.length )
            return rhs.length - src.rhs.length;
        for( int i=0; i<rhs.length; i++ ) {
            int diff = rhs[i].compareTo(src.rhs[i]);
            if(diff != 0)
                return diff;
        }
        return 0;
    }
    ...
}

I also changed StringBuffer to StringBuilder (a bit more efficient here for not using synchronization) and used only one compareTo in the loop. You could also optimize the toString method a bit more by using two appends for each + operator here.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the essence from the discussion in the comments to the question. I happened to randomly hit the solution with my first remark here. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Apr 28 '11 at 23:16

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