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so im practicing the STL string class, but i can not figure out why the string->length function won't come up with the correct answer of 5, and only 2 (no matter the actual length). Here's the program i'm trying to run but it thinks that there are only 2 items between ->begin and ->end:

void testFunc(string _string[])
{
      int _offset = 0;
      string::const_iterator i;
      for (i = _string->begin(); i != _string->end(); i++)
      {
           cout << _offset << "\t";
           cout << _string[_offset] << endl;
           _offset ++;
      }
};

int main()
{
     string Hello[] = {"Hi", "Holla", "Eyo", "Whatsup", "Hello"};

     testFunc(Hello);

     char response;
     cin >> response;
     return 0;
}

The output is:

0     Hi
1     Holla  

Thanks! =)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're iterating through the first string, which is "Hi" - it has two characters, so you see two entries.

If you want to go all STL, you'd need a vector instead of a C-style array (i.e. vector<string>, and use an iterator on that.

If you don't want STL:

    void testFunc(string *strings, int stringCount)
    {
        int _offset = 0;

        while (stringCount--)
        {
            cout << _offset << "\t";
            cout << _strings[_offset] << endl;
            _offset ++;
        }
    };

int main()
{
    string Hello[] = {"Hi", "Holla", "Eyo", "Whatsup", "Hello"};

    testFunc(Hello, sizeof(Hello) / sizeof(Hello[0]));

    char response;
    cin >> response;
    return 0;
}
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how do i do it if i don't need to go all STL? And Thanks for the Answers! –  Griffin Apr 29 '11 at 1:47
    
A C array doesn't have a built-in size, so you'll need to pass it into the function. Let me edit my answer. –  EboMike Apr 29 '11 at 1:54
    
An array always has a specific and fixed size. –  GManNickG Apr 29 '11 at 1:57
    
@GMan: My point was that a function that receives an array through a pointer will not be able to retrieve the size. Granted, that wasn't really worded particularly clearly. –  EboMike Apr 29 '11 at 2:05
    
I know. :) –  GManNickG Apr 29 '11 at 2:06

The issue is with the expressions:

_string->begin()
_string->end()

Thinking of a->b as the same as (*a).b, we can see that they are:

(*_string).begin()
(*_string).end()

*x is the same as x[0], so we have:

_string[0].begin()
_string[0].end()

As _string[0] contains "Hi", you can see why the iteration is only two steps.

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The problem is that you are trying to is iterate a c array.

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