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Why does the following code Timeout the second (and subsequent) time it is run?

The code hangs at:

using (Stream objStream = request.GetResponse().GetResponseStream())

and then causes a WebException saying that the request has timed out.

I have tried this with a WebRequest and HttpWebRequest

Edit: It seems the code is falling over in request.GetResponse()

Edit: This post suggests it may be a GC issue --> http://www.vbforums.com/showthread.php?t=610043 - as per this post the issue is mitigated if Fiddler is open in the background.

The server is there and available for requests.

    private string GetQLMResponse(string URL)
    {
        HttpWebRequest request = WebRequest.Create(URL) as HttpWebRequest;
        request.Credentials = new NetworkCredential(Settings.Default.LicenseUser, Settings.Default.LicensePassword);
        request.KeepAlive = false;
        request.Timeout = 5000;
        request.Proxy = null;

        // Read stream
        string responseString = String.Empty;
        try
        {
            using (var response = request.GetResponse())
            {
                using (Stream objStream = response.GetResponseStream())
                {
                    using (StreamReader objReader = new StreamReader(objStream))
                    {
                        responseString = objReader.ReadToEnd();
                        objReader.Close();
                    }
                    objStream.Flush();
                    objStream.Close();
                }
                response.Close();
            }
        }
        catch (WebException ex)
        {
            throw new LicenseServerUnavailableException();
        }
        finally
        {
            request.Abort();
            request = null;
            GC.Collect();
        }
        return responseString;
    }

Thrown WebException is:

{"The operation has timed out"} [System.Net.WebException]: {"The operation has timed out"} Data: {System.Collections.ListDictionaryInternal} HelpLink: null InnerException: null Message: "The operation has timed out" Source: "System" StackTrace: " at System.Net.HttpWebRequest.GetResponse()\r\n at IQX.Licensing.License.GetQLMResponse(String URL) in C:\Users\jd\SVN\jd\Products\Development\JAD.Licensing\JAD.Licensing\License.cs:line 373" TargetSite: {System.Net.WebResponse GetResponse()}


Update: OK So the following code now works. The servicePoint was setting the timeout to be near 4 minutes. Changing ServicePoint.ConnectionLeaseTimeout on the request object means that the request is now destroyed after 5000ms. Thanks to all for your help and also to these 2 pages:

  1. http://blogs.msdn.com/b/adarshk/archive/2005/01/02/345411.aspx
  2. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6hszazfz(v=VS.80).aspx

    private string GetQLMResponse(string URL)
    {
        HttpWebRequest request = WebRequest.Create(URL) as HttpWebRequest;
        request.Credentials = new NetworkCredential(Settings.Default.LicenseUser, Settings.Default.LicensePassword);
        request.KeepAlive = false;
        request.Timeout = 5000;
        request.Proxy = null;
    
        request.ServicePoint.ConnectionLeaseTimeout = 5000;
        request.ServicePoint.MaxIdleTime = 5000;
    
        // Read stream
        string responseString = String.Empty;
        try
        {
            using (WebResponse response = request.GetResponse())
            {
                using (Stream objStream = response.GetResponseStream())
                {
                    using (StreamReader objReader = new StreamReader(objStream))
                    {
                        responseString = objReader.ReadToEnd();
                        objReader.Close();
                    }
                    objStream.Flush();
                    objStream.Close();
                }
                response.Close();
            }
        }
        catch (WebException ex)
        {
            throw new LicenseServerUnavailableException();
        }
        finally
        {
            request.Abort();
        }
        return responseString;
    }
    
share|improve this question
    
Any reason you tagged this with gc? –  ChrisWue Apr 29 '11 at 1:50
    
this post suggests that it may be a garbage collection issue: vbforums.com/showthread.php?t=610043 –  Macropus Apr 29 '11 at 1:53
1  
Oh, thanks for posting the update. Fixed my problem. –  Nic Wise Sep 22 '11 at 15:25
2  
Thanks for posting your solution. Saved me a bit of time today. –  Etch May 30 '12 at 15:43
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

On the heels of the previous answers, I wanted to add a couple more things. By default HttpWebRequest allows only 2 connections to the same host (this is HTTP 1.1 "niceness"),

Yes, it can be overriden, no I won't tell you how in this question, you have to ask another one :) I think you ought to look at this post.

I think that you are still not quite disposing of all your resources connected with the HttpWebRequest, so the connection pooling comes into play and that's the problem. I wouldn't try to fight the 2 connections per server rule, unless you really have to.

As one of the posters above noted, Fiddler is doing you a bit of a disservice in this case.

I'd add a nice finally {} clause after your catch and make sure that as the above post notes, all streams are flushed, closed and references to the request object are set to null.

Please let us know if this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I have tried forcing it to use HTTP 1.0. I have tried setting the request to null. And then doing a GC.Collect() - to no avail. –  Macropus Apr 29 '11 at 3:18
1  
@JD, also try doing netstat -n | find /i "<IPaddress>", where <IPaddress> is the IP of the service. How many times is it listed and what state are the connections in? –  dawebber Apr 29 '11 at 3:41
1  
@JD, try turning off TCPKeepAlive on the ServicePointManager, by setting the appropriate timeouts, etc. I still think something is weird here, and the server is not RFC2616-compliant or there is some sort of a strange reverse proxy in front of it or there is connection throttling in place on the server side. –  dawebber Apr 29 '11 at 4:26
2  
@dawebber: Thanks, I have now got it working using the request.ServicePoint class and settings properties on that. This was also of help --> msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6hszazfz(v=VS.80).aspx –  Macropus Apr 29 '11 at 4:33
1  
@dawebber: The server is IIS 7.5 and 'should' be compliant. It is now working by altering the timeouts to 5 seconds. Thanks for your help :) –  Macropus Apr 29 '11 at 4:37
show 7 more comments

The WebResponse obtained by request.GetReponse() MUST be disposed properly. Try this (removing request.Abort() and GC.Collect() calls):

using (var wresponse = request.GetResponse())
{
   using (Stream objStream = wresponse.GetResponseStream())
   {
        // ...
   }
}

Edit: Since it still does not work, I suggest you to test this with an empty windows application. This way, you could isolate app.config problems or maximum concurrent calls per host* (are you using other webrequest object somewhere else in your application to this host; which webresponse are not disposed properly?).

Hope this solve your problem, I am out of ideas!

  • See Jon Skeet's answer here.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but this is still causing the same issue to occur. I have updated the source code above to reflect your suggestions. –  Macropus Apr 29 '11 at 2:27
    
AFAIK WebResponse does not implement IDisposable. –  Macropus Apr 29 '11 at 2:36
    
@JD: Yes it does. WebResponse class signature: public abstract class WebResponse : MarshalByRefObject, ISerializable, IDisposable (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…). Howver, WebRequest DOES NOT implement IDisposable. –  Sam B Apr 29 '11 at 2:40
    
@JD: Can you post the Exception message caught in your try-catch (with the updated code)? –  Sam B Apr 29 '11 at 2:46
    
@SamB: I stand corrected - I could not see the Dispose method in Intelisense... Just positing exception above. –  Macropus Apr 29 '11 at 2:53
show 6 more comments

As you have stated, running fiddler in the background would mitigate the issue. This is because fiddler force closes any responses. Extending on the above post from Sam B I would ensure that the response is closed like so:

using (var wresponse = request.GetResponse())
{
   using (Stream objStream = wresponse.GetResponseStream())
   {
        // ...
   } 
   wresponse.close();
}

Also it may be worth setting the proxy to null like so:

 request.Proxy = Null;

As the .NET framework will go out searching for a proxy unless you explicitly do this. When fiddler is running this effect would be mitigated as fiddlers proxy would be found directly.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not helping solve the problem either. –  Macropus Apr 29 '11 at 2:31
    
That's odd. Only other thing that I can suggest is this fix from Phil Haak: haacked.com/archive/2004/05/15/… –  Sean Hunter Apr 29 '11 at 2:38
    
Thanks, just tried all of that, not getting the same headers as they are.. –  Macropus Apr 29 '11 at 2:50
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