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Any ideas on an async directory search using fs.readdir? I realise that we could introduce recursion and call the read directory function with the next directory to read, but am a little worried about it not being async...

Any ideas? I've looked at node-walk which is great, but doest give me just the files in an array, like readdir does. Although

Looking for output like...

['file1.txt', 'file2.txt', 'dir/file3.txt']
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12 Answers

up vote 139 down vote accepted

There's basically two ways of accomplishing this. In an async environment you'll notice that there are two kinds of loops: serial and parallel. A serial loop waits for one iteration to complete before it moves onto the next iteration - this guarantees that every iteration of the loop completes in order. In a parallel loop, all the iterations are started at the same time, and one may complete before another, however, it is much faster than a serial loop. So in this case, it's probably better to use a parallel loop because it doesn't matter what order the walk completes in, just as long as it completes and returns the results (unless you want them in order).

A parallel loop would look like this:

var fs = require('fs');
var walk = function(dir, done) {
  var results = [];
  fs.readdir(dir, function(err, list) {
    if (err) return done(err);
    var pending = list.length;
    if (!pending) return done(null, results);
    list.forEach(function(file) {
      file = dir + '/' + file;
      fs.stat(file, function(err, stat) {
        if (stat && stat.isDirectory()) {
          walk(file, function(err, res) {
            results = results.concat(res);
            if (!--pending) done(null, results);
          });
        } else {
          results.push(file);
          if (!--pending) done(null, results);
        }
      });
    });
  });
};

A serial loop would look like this:

var fs = require('fs');
var walk = function(dir, done) {
  var results = [];
  fs.readdir(dir, function(err, list) {
    if (err) return done(err);
    var i = 0;
    (function next() {
      var file = list[i++];
      if (!file) return done(null, results);
      file = dir + '/' + file;
      fs.stat(file, function(err, stat) {
        if (stat && stat.isDirectory()) {
          walk(file, function(err, res) {
            results = results.concat(res);
            next();
          });
        } else {
          results.push(file);
          next();
        }
      });
    })();
  });
};

And to test it out on your home directory (WARNING: the results list will be huge if you have a lot of stuff in your home directory):

walk(process.env.HOME, function(err, results) {
  if (err) throw err;
  console.log(results);
});

EDIT: Improved examples.

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Thats exactly what I was after! It's running on a directory (with many subdirectories) that gets files uploaded to it periodically. Once they arrive, they're added to a database and deleted, so there will probably be only about 20-50 files to process at a time. Thanks again! –  crawf Apr 29 '11 at 4:41
    
Actually, the serial version seems to display files in the root directory..but the parallel doesnt... –  crawf Apr 29 '11 at 5:28
4  
Beware, the "parallel loop" answer from chjj above has a bug in cases when an empty folder is walked. The fix is: var pending = list.length; if(!pending)done(null, results); // add this line! list.forEach(function(file) { ... –  Vasil Daskalopoulos Nov 10 '11 at 17:29
6  
file = dir + '/' + file; This is not recommended. You should use: var path = require('path'); file = path.resolve(dir, file); –  Leiko Oct 3 '13 at 16:19
1  
@onetrickpony because if you use path.resolve(...) you will get a proper path whether you are on Windows or Unix :) Meaning that you will get something like C:\\some\\foo\\path on Windows and /some/foo/path on Unix systems –  Leiko Dec 22 '13 at 20:00
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A. Have a look at the file module. It has a function called walk:

file.walk(start, callback)

Navigates a file tree, calling callback for each directory, passing in (null, dirPath, dirs, files).

This may be for you! And yes, it is async. However, I think you would have to aggregate the full path's yourself, if you needed them.

B. An alternative, and even one of my favourites: use the unix find for that. Why do something again, that has already been programmed? Maybe not exactly what you need, but still worth checking out:

var execFile = require('child_process').execFile;
execFile('find', [ 'somepath/' ], function(err, stdout, stderr) {
  var file_list = stdout.split('\n');
  /* now you've got a list with full path file names */
});

Find has a nice build-in caching mechanism that makes subsequent searches very fast, as long as only few folder have changed.

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1  
Well done. I particularly appreciate the note about caching. –  Roshambo Jan 18 '12 at 1:47
2  
I upvoted for the suggestion to use file as a module that does this, it's better then implementing your own ad-hoc code. That said, calling a unix utility for this is lame. –  Evan Carroll Mar 4 '13 at 8:14
2  
Is this UNIX only? –  Mohsen Jul 23 '13 at 20:17
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Another nice npm package is glob.

npm install glob

It is very powerful and should cover all your recursing needs.

Edit:

I actually wasn't perfectly happy with glob, so I created readdirp.

I'm very confident that its API makes finding files and directories recursively and applying specific filters very easy.

Read through its documentation to get a better idea of what it does and install via:

npm install readdirp

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Best module in my opinion. And is alike many other projects, like Grunt, Mocha, etc. and other 80'000+ other projects. Just saying. –  Yanick Rochon Mar 12 at 15:06
1  
readdirp works like a charm... –  JVerstry Apr 7 at 17:52
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Just in case anyone finds it useful, I also put together a synchronous version.

var walk = function(dir) {
    var results = []
    var list = fs.readdirSync(dir)
    list.forEach(function(file) {
        file = dir + '/' + file
        var stat = fs.statSync(file)
        if (stat && stat.isDirectory()) results = results.concat(walk(file))
        else results.push(file)
    })
    return results
}
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6  
I like this solution, except for your lack of semi-colons! –  Mark Aug 31 '13 at 18:44
    
This is simple. But also a bit naive. Might cause a stackoverflow if a directory contains a link to a parent directory. Maybe use lstat instead? Or else add a recursiveness check to limit the recursivity level. –  conradk Apr 18 at 22:21
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If you want to use an npm package, wrench is pretty good.

var wrench = require("wrench");

var files = wrench.readdirSyncRecursive("directory");

wrench.readdirRecursive("directory", function (error, files) {
    // live your dreams
});
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thats awesome - another handy option! –  crawf Apr 26 '12 at 5:27
    
dive would be another handy async option. ;) –  pvorb Sep 7 '12 at 2:15
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I loved the answer from chjj above and would not have been able to create my version of the parallel loop without that start.

var fs = require("fs");

var tree = function(dir, done) {
  var results = {
        "path": dir
        ,"children": []
      };
  fs.readdir(dir, function(err, list) {
    if (err) { return done(err); }
    var pending = list.length;
    if (!pending) { return done(null, results); }
    list.forEach(function(file) {
      fs.stat(dir + '/' + file, function(err, stat) {
        if (stat && stat.isDirectory()) {
          tree(dir + '/' + file, function(err, res) {
            results.children.push(res);
            if (!--pending){ done(null, results); }
          });
        } else {
          results.children.push({"path": dir + "/" + file});
          if (!--pending) { done(null, results); }
        }
      });
    });
  });
};

module.exports = tree;

I created a Gist as well. Comments welcome. I am still starting out in the NodeJS realm so that is one way I hope to learn more.

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Great! Thanks for sharing :) –  crawf Sep 14 '12 at 3:42
    
Good example of a JSON-variant! Should deserve some more upvotes as well, as you helped me out! +1 –  Eric Smekens Oct 24 '13 at 10:15
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I've coded this recently, and thought it would make sense to share this here. The code makes use of the async library.

var fs = require('fs');
var async = require('async');

var scan = function(dir, suffix, callback) {
  fs.readdir(dir, function(err, files) {
    var returnFiles = [];
    async.each(files, function(file, next) {
      var filePath = dir + '/' + file;
      fs.stat(filePath, function(err, stat) {
        if (err) {
          return next(err);
        }
        if (stat.isDirectory()) {
          scan(filePath, suffix, function(err, results) {
            if (err) {
              return next(err);
            }
            returnFiles = returnFiles.concat(results);
            next();
          })
        }
        else if (stat.isFile()) {
          if (file.indexOf(suffix, file.length - suffix.length) !== -1) {
            returnFiles.push(filePath);
          }
          next();
        }
      });
    }, function(err) {
      callback(err, returnFiles);
    });
  });
};

You can use it like this:

scan('/some/dir', '.ext', function(err, files) {
  // Do something with files that ends in '.ext'.
  console.log(files);
});
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1  
This. This is so tidy and simple to use. I pumped it out into a module, required it and it works like a mcdream sandwich. –  Jay Sep 22 '13 at 11:25
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Check out the final-fs library. It provides a readdirRecursive function:

ffs.readdirRecursive(dirPath, true, 'my/initial/path')
    .then(function (files) {
        // in the `files` variable you've got all the files
    })
    .otherwise(function (err) {
        // something went wrong
    });
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best solution for me –  NSjonas May 13 at 17:11
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Because everyone should write his own, I made one.

walk(dir, cb, endCb) cb(file) endCb(err | null)

DIRTY

module.exports = walk;

function walk(dir, cb, endCb) {
  var fs = require('fs');
  var path = require('path');

  fs.readdir(dir, function(err, files) {
    if (err) {
      return endCb(err);
    }

    var pending = files.length;
    if (pending === 0) {
      endCb(null);
    }
    files.forEach(function(file) {
      fs.stat(path.join(dir, file), function(err, stats) {
        if (err) {
          return endCb(err)
        }

        if (stats.isDirectory()) {
          walk(path.join(dir, file), cb, function() {
            pending--;
            if (pending === 0) {
              endCb(null);
            }
          });
        } else {
          cb(path.join(dir, file));
          pending--;
          if (pending === 0) {
            endCb(null);
          }
        }
      })
    });

  });
}
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check out loaddir https://npmjs.org/package/loaddir

npm install loaddir

  loaddir = require('loaddir')

  allJavascripts = []
  loaddir({
    path: __dirname + '/public/javascripts',
    callback: function(){  allJavascripts.push(this.relativePath + this.baseName); }
  })

You can use fileName instead of baseName if you need the extension as well.

An added bonus is that it will watch the files as well and call the callback again. There are tons of configuration options to make it extremely flexible.

I just remade the guard gem from ruby using loaddir in a short while

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Standalone promise implementation

I am using the when.js promise library in this example.

var fs = require('fs')
, path = require('path')
, when = require('when')
, nodefn = require('when/node/function');

function walk (directory, includeDir) {
    var results = [];
    return when.map(nodefn.call(fs.readdir, directory), function(file) {
        file = path.join(directory, file);
        return nodefn.call(fs.stat, file).then(function(stat) {
            if (stat.isFile()) { return results.push(file); }
            if (includeDir) { results.push(file + path.sep); }
            return walk(file, includeDir).then(function(filesInDir) {
                results = results.concat(filesInDir);
            });
        });
    }).then(function() {
        return results;
    });
};

walk(__dirname).then(function(files) {
    console.log(files);
}).otherwise(function(error) {
    console.error(error.stack || error);
});

I've included an optional parameter includeDir which will include directories in the file listing if set to true.

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Use node-dir to produce exactly the output you like

var dir = require('node-dir');

dir.files(__dirname, function(err, files) {
  if (err) throw err;
  console.log(files);
  //we have an array of files now, so now we can iterate that array
  files.forEach(function(path) {
    action(null, path);
  })
});
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