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To start, I realized there is probably a better way to do this, and rather than throwing an exception I should just handle the condition better. That being said, I ran into some unexpected behavior and I'm more curious why this is happening than using it my application.

In a method, I am attempting to access a file provided by the user. At he beginning of the method, I am checking to make sure that the path to the file is not Null or String.Empty and throwing an exception if it is. When I was testing, I am finding that the exception is thrown regardless of the condition. Is this normal behavior, or am i missing something?

public static XElement Foo(String path)
{
    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(path))
    {
       throw new ArgumentNullException(); // this exception is thrown  
                                          // regardless of the value of 'path'
    }


    // code to open and parse file
    // returns XElement
}

UPDATE:

In my testing scenerio, the calling method is just sending a default path that i hard coded for the test. I have not completed the UI, so the code for the user to define the path is not complete.

private const string c_fooPath = "C:\\test\\text.txt"

public void CallingFoo()
{
    var xml = Foo(c_fooPath)

    // some code

}

UPDATE #2:

Just to mention some of my other tests i have tried. I have tried

if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(path))
{
    Console.WriteLine("testing")       // this line is skipped when my condition is
                                       // false but runs when  i force it to be true

    throw new ArgumentNullException(); // this exception is thrown  
                                       // regardless of the value of 'path'
}

if (false)
{
    throw new ArgumentNullException(); // the exception is not thrown here - the only
                                       // condition i have found so far.
}

public static XElement Foo(String path)
{
    path = "test";

    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(path))
    {
       throw new ArgumentNullException(); // exception is still thrown  
    }


    // code to open and parse file
    // returns XElement
}
share|improve this question
    
Hi. Please include the call to this method Foo. Then it would make more sense. Also, its String.Empty and not otherwise :) . Thanks. –  Vaibhav Apr 29 '11 at 5:12
    
Are you sure you have tested a condition where the string has data? This seems like it should only throw on null or empty... Looks right to me. Try setting the string to a value just before you if statement, and see if it still throws. –  Mikecito Apr 29 '11 at 5:14
    
@Vaibhav what is string.Empty in which context are you mentioning this ? –  V4Vendetta Apr 29 '11 at 5:15
    
Are you sure its throwing an exception regardless of the path? Try replacing if(String.IsNullOrEmpty(path)) with if(False) an see if it still throws an exception. –  Statler Apr 29 '11 at 5:16
    
@Vaibhav - thanks corrected the typo - that's what i get for asking this question at 1am. I don't think the calling method is necessary because i am asking why is the throw line thrown no matter what the value of the string is. –  psubsee2003 Apr 29 '11 at 5:18
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I've given your code a quick test and it works as expected, i. e. throws only the exception if the string is null or empty. Debug your code to see if the given path actually has content and really isn't empty or null. Maybe there could also something wrong in the caller of the function.

My testcode (returns void instead of your XElement):

class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        Foo("test");
    }

    public static void Foo(String path) {
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(path)) {
            throw new ArgumentNullException();
        }
    }
}

You could also try Convert.ToString((object)stringVar) == "" instead of String.IsNullOrEmpty.

Update: Maybe this or this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks macs. Based on your answer, I decided to commented out the rest of the method and set it to just return a null. It behaved correctly, so my problem is somewhere else in my method. Just doesn't make sense. Thanks. –  psubsee2003 Apr 29 '11 at 5:45
    
@psubsee2003: I provided two links, maybe these are helpful. Especially the first one, seems to regard a similar problem. –  Sebastian Dressler Apr 29 '11 at 5:47
add comment

Try this:

private const c_fooPath = @"C:\test\text.txt"

public void CallingFoo()
{
    var xml = Foo(c_fooPath)

    // some code

}

When declaring string variables having slashes (\) use either of the following ways:

1) private const c_fooPath = @"C:\test\text.txt"

2) private const c_fooPath = "C:\\test\\text.txt"

Hope it helps!

Thanks.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks Vaibhav, I actually do have "C:\\test\\text.txt", in my haste, I just forgot to include them. Thanks –  psubsee2003 Apr 29 '11 at 5:39
    
@psubsee2003 - Not an issue. Tried the code snippet you provided in a console app and it works just fine :) –  Vaibhav Apr 29 '11 at 5:43
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