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I have the following java code.

public class CheckInnerStatic {

private static class Test {
    static {
        System.out.println("Static block initialized");
    }
    public Test () {
        System.out.println("Constructor called");
    }
}

    public static void main (String[] args) throws ClassNotFoundException, InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException {
        System.out.println("Inside main");
        Class.forName("Test");    // Doesn't work, gives ClassNotFoundException
        //Test test = new Test();   // Works fine
    }
}

Why doesn't the class.forname("Test") work here while the next line works fine?

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Just to set the terminologies right, there's nothing like a static inner class. You've nested classes - static and non-static (inner). –  Swapnil Aug 1 at 13:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Use $

public class CheckInnerStatic {

    private static class Test {
    static {
        System.out.println("Static block initialized");
    }
    public Test () {
        System.out.println("Constructor called");
    }
}

    public static void main (String[] args) throws ClassNotFoundException, InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException {
        System.out.println("Inside main");
        Class<?> cls = Class.forName("CheckInnerStatic$Test");
        //Test test = new Test();
    }
}
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You need to use the fully qualified class name, i.e. yourpackage.CheckInnerStatic$Test (assuming you defined a package, otherwise skip that part).

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Sorry to say but that doesn't seem to work either, am i wrong? Also how am I able to instantiate the Test class without giving the full name as you said but am not able to load it? –  Vivek Apr 29 '11 at 6:56
    
Use yourpackage.CheckInnerStatic$Test. The $ sign is used to qualify inner classes. –  Christoph Walesch Apr 29 '11 at 7:02
    
please update your answer. You need to use $ character instead of dot to load inner class. –  Henryk Konsek Apr 29 '11 at 7:04
    
@Henry, you're right ;) –  Thomas Apr 29 '11 at 7:08
Class innerClass = Class.forName("com.foo.OuterClass$InnerClass");
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